Archive for the ‘harvey kurtzman’ Category

Monday, May 19th, 2014

Comic Books: Harvey Kurtzman’s Funny Animal Comic Books

Kurtzman Comic Books

Today, Kent Butterworth stopped by on his lunch break to watch Terry Bears cartoons featuring eye popping Jim Tyer animation. I realized that it’s been a while since I posted any comic book scans from Kent’s great collection of golden age funny animal comics. I’m righting that wrong right now with some great examples by Harvey Kurtzman. Enjoy! (Thanks Kent!)

Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books

Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books

Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books

Animator Michael Sporn has shared a tremendous pile of Kurtzman comic collaborations with Jack Davis. Check them out!

Kurtzman and Davis: Part One / Part Two / Part Three / Part Four / Part Five / Part Six

RECOMMENDED BOOK

 Harvey Kurtzman: Mad Genius

Harvey Kurtzman had a Midas touch for talent, but was himself an astonishingly talented and influential artist, writer, editor, and satirist. The creator of MAD and Playboy’s “Little Annie Fanny” was called, “One of the most important figures in postwar America” by the New York Times. Kurtzman’s groundbreaking “realistic” war comics of the early ’50s and various satirical publications (MAD, Trump, Humbug, and Help!) had an immense impact on popular culture, inspiring a generation of underground cartoonists. Without Kurtzman, it’s unlikely we’d have had Airplane, SNL, or National Lampoon. This definitive book includes hundreds of never-before-seen illustrations, paintings, pencil sketches, newly discovered lost E.C. Comics layouts, color compositions, illustrated correspondence, and vintage photos from the rich Kurtzman archives

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Comic BooksComic Books

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Comic Books.

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

Inbetweens: Harvery Kurtzman’s Hey Look Comics

Harvey Kurtzman’s “Hey Look” is one of the stylistically most pure comics ever made. Every panel is a jewel of composition, posing and simplicity. But don’t take my word for it. Check out what John Kricfalusi has to say. Here is a sampling of “Hey Look” comics culled from around the web…

Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics
Kurtzman Hey Look Comics

Harvey Kurtzman Book

If you don’t already have it, rush right out now and get The Art of Harvey Kurtzman: The Mad Genius of Comics. Kurtzman was one of the most important artists in the entire history of cartooning. His influence is felt far and wide, not just for great comics like “Hey Look”, but for the EC horror comics, Mad Magazine and Playboy’s “Little Annie Fanny”. Every cartoonist should have this book.

Friday, July 19th, 2013

Magazine Cartoons: Kurtzman and Elder’s Little Annie Fanny

Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny

Today, we are featuring the work of two giants of cartooning… Harvey Kurtzman and Will Elder.

KurtzmanKurtzmanHarvey Kurtzman made a name for himself in his early years with the one page "Hey Look!" comics, as well as his work editing EC Comics’ war comics. His style was detailed and thorough. His layouts and continuity breakdowns left little room for deviation. When EC decided to create a humor line, Kurtzman was assigned the job as the founding editor of Mad. Beginning as a ten cent comic book, and eventually switching to a twenty five cent magazine (to avoid review by the Comics Code Authority), Mad became a huge hit in the five years it was under Kurtzman’s leadership. Much of the sensibilities of Kurtzman’s work for Mad are shared by "Little Annie Fanny" for Playboy.

Will ElderWill ElderWill Elder worked as an artist under Kurtzman at EC and on Mad, expanding and elaborating on Kurtzman’s detailed layouts. They were a great team, and the combination of Kurtzman’s foreground action and Elder’s background gags became a standard device for them throughout their collaborations. Other artists who worked on the "Little Annie Fanny" series were Jack Davis, Russ Heath and Al Jaffee (all former Mad alumni).

The "Little Annie Fanny" series debuted in the October 1962 issue of Playboy magazine. The comic was a parody of the Playboy image itself, vaguely based on the "Little Orphan Annie" theme, with lots of topical references and pokes at popular culture. The strip was the first fully painted comic in American magazines, and was very time consuming to produce. Kurtzman continued the series until 1988- its 100th episode- when he retired it, stating that all of the possible story ideas for the character had been exhausted.

January 1963

Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny

April 1964

Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny

March 1966

Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny

Little Annie FannyCheck out these great "Little Annie Fanny" collections at Amazon.com!

We’ll have more great Playboy cartoons for you soon.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.