Archive for the ‘terrytoons’ Category

Wednesday, August 20th, 2014

Animation: Terrytoons’ Catnip Capers

Terrytoons Catnip Capers

Today, we digitized a batch of Terrytoons from the 3/4 inch masters given to me by John Kricfalusi. Among them was a real gem… Catnip Capers (1940).

Terrytoons Catnip Capers

Terrytoons Catnip Capers

This cartoon is among the best cartoons TerryToons ever produced. It starts out like a typical Terry cat and mouse cartoon, but before long, it’s gone off on a wild tangent into feline surrealism and exotica.

Terrytoons Catnip Capers

Terrytoons Catnip Capers

The backgrounds in this cartoons are spectacular. If anyone out there knows who laid out or painted these, please post to the comments below. There are times where backgrounds and layout are equal in importance to the animation of the characters… a couple of good examples would be the end of Tex Avery’s "King Size Canary" and the St. James Infirmary Blues sequence of "Betty Boop in Snow White". This cartoon certainly fits in that category as well.

Terrytoons Catnip Capers

Terrytoons Catnip Capers

Terrytoons Catnip Capers

Terrytoons have been ufairly criticized as being "monotonous", "predictable" and "boring" in just about every animation history book that references them. Animation Resources has made it a goal to collect and make available as much of the output of the studio as possible to put the lie to those mischaracterizations.

Terrytoons Catnip Capers

Terrytoons Catnip Capers

Catnip Capers (Terry/1940)
(Quicktime 7 / 13.5 megs)

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Animated CartoonsAnimated Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Animation.

Friday, July 25th, 2014

Animation: Canemaker on Tytla

Bill Tytla

John Canemaker lent us a copy of an article he wrote for an exhibit of artwork by Bill Tytla. Tytla was a giant among animators, known for his solid, dimensional drawings and convincing depiction of weight and mass.

Here is the complete article…

Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla
Bill Tytla

Thanks to John Canemaker for sharing this with us.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Animated CartoonsAnimated Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Animation.

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

Animation: Carlo Vinci Notes From Terry-Toons

Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons

Not long ago, archive assistant Amir Avni, John Kricfalusi and I took a trip out to visit Carlo Vinci’s family at the home of his wife, Margaret. Mrs. Vinci graciously welcomed us into her home for a tour of her collection of artwork belonging to her late husband. Carlo’s animation desk, which he designed and built himself, still stands in his office just as he left it, with caricatures by co-workers hanging above it on the wall. Every room in the house has beautiful artwork filling the space. It was an awe inspiring experience to get a chance to see it all.

Vinci Family

John K, Steve Worth and Margaret Vinci


Carlo Vinci was a remarkable artist. He received classical art training at the National Academy of Design in 1930. He joined Paul Terry’s Terry-Toons soon after, and worked there for twenty years. He came West to join Joe Barbera at MGM, and ended up as the lead animator at H-B for twenty more years. But as I learned at my visit, those great achievements were only a small part of his story. In addition to cartooning, Vinci was an all-around fine artist, adept at oil painting, watercolor, illustration, stained glass and sculpture… in a variety of styles, from classical to baroque to art deco… with a wide range of subjects- still lifes, portraiture, landscapes and religious subjects. It was a mind blowing experience to discover the depth of talent behind a cartoonist we thought we already knew.

Vinci Family

Carlo Vinci’s son, Paul and grandson, John
with John K in front of Vinci’s self-portrait

After we had viewed all the amazing artwork, Mrs. Vinci invited us to enjoy some home made Italian desserts with her family. Excited by everything we had seen, we had plenty of questions about Carlo and his wonderful career as an artist. We asked if she had met him before he started working for Terry-Toons or after, and she replied, "He was working for Mr. Terry when I met him. When we were courting, he lived in the Bronx, and I lived in Brooklyn. It was a long trip across town to meet for our date every Wednesday evening. Carlo would send me a little note with a cartoon every day in the mail when we couldn’t be together. I’ve saved them all these years, but I don’t suppose you would be interested in seeing them…"

Naturally, we were! Her son, Paul Vinci helped her to retrieve the hundreds of letters from a closet- all on Terry animation paper in envelopes with the distinctive Terry-Toons logo. Dating from 1938 to 1939, these charming little notes had a personal message, along with brilliant drawings depicting Terry characters. Paul commented that he himself hadn’t seen the letters since he was very small; and even then, his mother only shared one or two with him. They had been bundled away carefully for over fifty years. Mrs. Vinci has kindly allowed us to share these drawings with you…

Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons

All of us at Animation Resources appreciate Mrs. Vinci’s generosity. Paul and John Vinci will be printing out this post and sharing it with her, so you can thank her yourself in the comments below.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Animated CartoonsAnimated Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Animation.