Archive for the ‘war’ Category

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

Editorial Cartoons: Arthur Szyk The New Order

Arthur Szyk was born in Poland and began painting at the age of four. He studied art in Paris until the outbreak of World War I, when he travelled East to study Mohammedan art. In 1914, he joined the Russian army, and later served as an officer in a guerrilla regiment in the Polish army. He married in 1921 and moved back to Paris, where he lived and painted until 1931. Szyk received many important commissions during this time… He illuminated the Covenant of the League of Nations, painted a series of miniatures dealing with the American Revolution that hangs in the White House, and spent three years working on an illumination of the Haggadah, the story of the Jews’ flight from Egypt which was dedicated to the King of England.

In 1940, Szyk relocated to Canada, eventually settling in New York City in 1941. Szyk’s political cartoons, which were published in the newspaper PM, were described by art critic, Thomas Craven as being “as compact as a bomb, extraordinarily lucid in statement, firm and incisive of line, and deadly in their characterizations.” The illustrations we scanned today are from a collection of Szyk’s political cartoons called “The New Order”..

Caricature is the foundation of cartooning. It involves the exaggeration of features to highlight and focus personality traits. Szyk was a master of caricature. His ability to clearly express the arrogance, irony and evil behind the trumped up facade of civilized behavior spoke louder than words. “The New Order” is a rare book. It was ahead of its time when it was published in 1941, before the United States entered the Second World War. Animation Resources was fortunate to locate a clean copy to digitize.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Editorial CartoonsEditorial Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Editorial Cartoons.
IllustrationIllustration

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit spotlighting Illustration.

Wednesday, October 8th, 2014

Magazine Cartoons: Virgil Partch’s Here We Go Again

Virgil Partch Here We Go Again

Today, we digitized Virgil Partch’s book, “Here We Go Again”. Here are some examples from this book…

Virgil Partch Here We Go Again

Virgil Partch Here We Go Again

Virgil Partch Here We Go Again

Virgil Partch Here We Go Again

Virgil Partch Here We Go Again

Virgil Partch Here We Go Again

Virgil Partch Here We Go Again

Virgil Partch Here We Go Again

Virgil Partch Here We Go Again

Virgil Partch Here We Go Again

Virgil Partch Here We Go Again

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.

Monday, September 15th, 2014

Illustration: Artzybasheff’s Diablerie

Artzybasheff Diablerie
Plowman, plowman, what of thy hands?

Recently, Danish political cartoons have created a firestorm of controversy all over the world. It shouldn’t be surprising that cartoons can evoke this sort of uproar; after all, back in the late 1800s Thomas Nast’s caricatures brought down Boss Tweed, and in the 1970s, Herb Block was a major thorn in Nixon’s side.

World War II was a prime era for political cartoonists. Passions ran high, and the whole world was at stake. Artists like Arthur Szyk and Boris Artzybasheff crystalized the passions and horrors of war in a way that speaks to us across the decades. Here is a selection of illustrations on the theme of war from Boris Artzybasheff’s book As I See.

In his introduction to the chapter entitled "Diablerie", Artzybasheff writes:

"Let’s sing hosannas to men this day, for theirs is the triumph of wit! In their long search for better tools and weapons, men at last have found the way of locking a pinch of cosmic force in a sheath of silver-white metal… as well as the means for making it go boom. Any time they wish, or think they must, men can touch off an orgasmic flash, making the oceans boil and seethe with fire, making the soil rise up in crimson dust… Perhaps after the cloud drifts thrice around it, the earth will emerge once more free of living things… In the hush of night this comely planet will go on waltzing in its ordained orbit until God awakens from His sleep and resolves it back to the primordial elements.

I try to shake this thought off; it may be that a healthy planet should have no more life upon it than a well-kept dog has fleas; but what posesses the flea to concoct its own flea powder?"

Artzybasheff Diablerie

Artzybasheff Diablerie
The Headless Horseman

Artzybasheff Diablerie
In Pursuit of Zeros

Artzybasheff Diablerie
Jet Propulsion: V-One

Artzybasheff Diablerie
Radio Propaganda

Artzybasheff Diablerie

Artzybasheff Diablerie

Artzybasheff Diablerie

Artzybasheff Diablerie

Artzybasheff Diablerie
The Pied Piper of Berchtesgaden

Artzybasheff Diablerie

Artzybasheff Diablerie
The Balance of Power

Artzybasheff Diablerie
The Triumph of Wit

Artzybasheff Diablerie
The Witches’ Sabbath

Many people who read this blog aren’t aware that Animation Resources isn’t just a website… it is much more than that. We are archiving these images at high resolution for the use of students, artists and researchers. As an example, here is an image of Hitler’s eye from the image above at the full resolution of our archival scan…

Artzybasheff Diablerie

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

IllustrationIllustration

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit spotlighting Illustration.