Archive for the ‘illustration’ Category

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

Inbetweens: Howard Pyle- Master of Romance and Adventure

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle was one of the most influential illustrators who ever lived. He singlehandedly defined how we think of pirates and knights in shining armor. I’ll have more on him soon, but in the meantime, here is a gallery of his work…

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Pyle was also an educator and his students included N. C. Wyeth, Frank Schoonover, Elenore Abbott, Ethel Franklin Betts, Anna Whelan Betts, Harvey Dunn, Clyde O. DeLand, Philip R. Goodwin, Violet Oakley, Ellen Bernard Thompson Pyle, Olive Rush, Allen Tupper True, and Jessie Willcox Smith. David Apatoff, at his fantastic blog Illustration Art posted about an assignment Pyle gave his students to come up with an illustration for the phrase “The End”. It’s fascinating reading, and it includes the illustrations Pyle’s illustrious students came up with. Check it out… Illustration Art: Howard Pyle’s Weekly Drawing Sessions

Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

Inbetweens: Franklin Booth Illustrations

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Here is a sample of work by influential pen and ink illustrator Franklin Booth.

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-Nicholas John Pozega

Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

Illustration: Gustaf Tenggren’s Little Trapper

Tenggren Little Trapper

Gustaf Tenggren was born in Sweden in 1896. Throughout the 1920s, he illustrated children’s books and fairy tales in a richly detailed style similar to Arthur Rackham and Kay Nielsen. In 1936, Walt Disney brought Tenggren to Hollywood to work on Snow White & the Seven Dwarfs. His designs for the Dwarfs’ cottage and the forest were directly incorporated into the film by the layout artists.

The experience of working at Disney changed Tenggren’s artistic outlook. He abandoned the European illustrator style for a simpler, more direct, stylized approach. He illustrated the most iconic Golden Books… The Poky Little Puppy, The Saggy Baggy Elephant, The Shy Little Kitten and The Tawny Scrawny Lion, and he continued to paint for Western Publishing until his death in the early sixties.

Tenggren’s Golden Books are exemplified by bold, clear compositions; a harmonious use of color and masterful rendering of a variety of textures. This book, The Little Trapper, is one of Tenggren’s least often seen titles. Published in 1950, several years before DIsney’s Davy Crockett popularized the coonskin cap, this book includes some disarmingly beautiful paintings. In particular, notice how Tenggren renders the fur. It’s a different technique every time.

Tenggren Little Trapper
Tenggren Little Trapper
Tenggren Little Trapper
Tenggren Little Trapper
Tenggren Little Trapper
Tenggren Little Trapper
Tenggren Little Trapper
Tenggren Little Trapper
Tenggren Little Trapper
Tenggren Little Trapper

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

IllustrationIllustration

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit spotlighting Illustration.