October 15th, 2014


Advice: Business of Art

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I see a lot of people starting out in animation focusing on the business aspects… creating lots of “product”, pitching show ideas to studios, worrying about people who might ask them to work for free on a personal project, posting ads to groups like this to try to get viewers… I’ve seen people who do all these sorts of things for almost a decade, and still aren’t any further along to success as an animated filmmaker than the day they started.

You don’t become successful in animation by having the “right package”. You become successful because you have the “right stuff”. You can sit down and really animate, do layout, design backgrounds… you have skills in constructive drawing, compositional principles, perspective, anatomy and life drawing, color theory, painting techniques…

Specialization aimed at a specific job title is the absolute WORST thing you can do in school. I went to design school to study graphic design. They taught me type speccing, paste up, how to use a linotype machine… A couple of years later the Macintosh came out and everything I learned was obsolete. The only classes that I still use today are the basic ones… Design 101, Color 101, Drawing 101. Going to a trade school to learn art or filmmaking is a good way to be replaced by outsourcing.

If you want to be an artist, LEARN TO BE AN ARTIST FIRST. With a solid foundation in the fundamentals, you can learn any trade quickly on your own time or on the job. You don’t have to pay a school thousands of dollars to make you an unemployable specialist in a field that is now being done in India or China.

Instead of putting sweat equity into a business opportunity, it’s a lot better to put that effort into investing into yourself and your skills. But that takes hard work, humility, experimentation, and a solid plan for self education. Make personal films, but CHALLENGE YOURSELF. Don’t just fill time quotas. That’s the hard way to become successful for sure, but it’s a sure road for advancement. “Playing the game” and “doing business” can go in circles forever and get you nowhere.

Posted by Stephen Worth @ 2:10 pm

2 Comments »

October 15th, 2014


Inbetweens: Howard Pyle- Master of Romance and Adventure

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle was one of the most influential illustrators who ever lived. He singlehandedly defined how we think of pirates and knights in shining armor. I’ll have more on him soon, but in the meantime, here is a gallery of his work…

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Howard Pyle Illustrations

Pyle was also an educator and his students included N. C. Wyeth, Frank Schoonover, Elenore Abbott, Ethel Franklin Betts, Anna Whelan Betts, Harvey Dunn, Clyde O. DeLand, Philip R. Goodwin, Violet Oakley, Ellen Bernard Thompson Pyle, Olive Rush, Allen Tupper True, and Jessie Willcox Smith. David Apatoff, at his fantastic blog Illustration Art posted about an assignment Pyle gave his students to come up with an illustration for the phrase “The End”. It’s fascinating reading, and it includes the illustrations Pyle’s illustrious students came up with. Check it out… Illustration Art: Howard Pyle’s Weekly Drawing Sessions

Posted by Stephen Worth @ 1:42 pm

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October 14th, 2014


Inbetweens: Franklin Booth Illustrations

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Here is a sample of work by influential pen and ink illustrator Franklin Booth.

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-Nicholas John Pozega

Posted by Nicholas Pozega @ 4:10 pm

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