Pinups: George Petty’s Ridgid Tools Calendars

Petty Girls

Petty GirlsPetty GirlsGeorge Petty was one of the top "cheesecake" illustrators of the 30s and 40s. He began his career with a series of cartoons featuring beautiful girls and their far from handsome beaus. His work coined the term "Petty Girls" to describe the carefully airbrushed girls with brilliant smiles and sexy poses. He left Esquire, to be replaced by Alberto Vargas who we will be featuring here soon, and became a freelance commercial artist. His girls soon ended up gracing magazine ads and calendars for such unlikely products as Tung-Sol Radio Tubes and the aptly named, Ridgid Tools.

Mike Fontanelli has generously allowed Animtion Resources to digitize his Rigid Tools. These calendar pages are among the most sought after pinup collectibles, selling for as much as $40 to $50 a sheet. Many thanks to Mike for sharing this with us.

Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls

Here’s an extra bonus! The 1947 True Magazine Petty Girl calendar…

Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.

4 Responses to “Pinups: George Petty’s Ridgid Tools Calendars”

  1. Justin says:

    Dear Mr. Worth,

    Thanks for this website. I think it’s a great resource. I wanted to thank you for a comment you posted years back defending Preston Blair’s book. In it you talked about the importance of organic shapes versus the geometric rigidity of the initial forms. This has been a great encouragement to me as I recently got back into drawing and have began the Blair studies. I thought I was going crazy noticing the differences between the initial form and the final form, but your comment really helped me see how to look at them both. Thanks!

  2. Dian Hanson says:

    Thought you’d like to make a correction as to the origins of the 1947 Petty calendar above. It is NOT an Esquire calendar, but a True magazine calendar. Petty stopped working for Esquire after 1941, returning only in the mid-1950s to do a couple more calendars. In the mid-40s he did pin-ups for the manly adventure magazine True.

  3. Thanks for the tip! I fixed it.

  4. Thanks so much for this!! I just got the 1947 True Magazine calendar at a flea market for 20 bucks, still bound. Didn’t know how great it was until now!! Thanks again!!

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