Archive for the ‘carlo vinci’ Category

Monday, December 29th, 2014

Illustration: Monks By Eduard von Grutzner

Monks by Eduard von Grutzner

Here is another interesting item from the collection of Carlo Vinci. These photographs were among his most prized posessions. They are turn of the century reproductions of the paintings of Eduard von Grutzner. Grutzner was born in 1846 and received classical art training at the Munich Academie under the noted realist painter, Karl von Piloty. Grutzner specialized in genre paintings, which formed the basis for the style of many classic book illustrators who followed. He was famous for his paintings of jolly gatherings in alehouses, hunting scenes, and humorous images of monastic life, which these particular images represent. Grutzner was successful and popular in his day, and died in 1925.

The family isn’t quite sure where Vinci obtained these photographs, but my guess is that they date back to his earliest years as a professional artist. After graduating from the National Academy of Design, Vinci was hired to do reproductions of classic paintings. It’s entirely possible that these were used by him as reference for reproductions of one or more Grutzner paintings. It’s easy to see why Vinci treasured these pictures. The compositions are classically perfect, the caricatures are well observed, the lighting is beautifully rendered, and a Falstaffian sense of humor makes the images a lot of fun.

Monks by Eduard von Grutzner
Monks by Eduard von Grutzner
Monks by Eduard von Grutzner
Monks by Eduard von Grutzner
Monks by Eduard von Grutzner
Monks by Eduard von Grutzner
Monks by Eduard von Grutzner
Monks by Eduard von Grutzner
Monks by Eduard von Grutzner
Monks by Eduard von Grutzner

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

IllustrationIllustration

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit spotlighting Illustration.

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

Animation: Carlo Vinci Notes From Terry-Toons

Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons

Not long ago, archive assistant Amir Avni, John Kricfalusi and I took a trip out to visit Carlo Vinci’s family at the home of his wife, Margaret. Mrs. Vinci graciously welcomed us into her home for a tour of her collection of artwork belonging to her late husband. Carlo’s animation desk, which he designed and built himself, still stands in his office just as he left it, with caricatures by co-workers hanging above it on the wall. Every room in the house has beautiful artwork filling the space. It was an awe inspiring experience to get a chance to see it all.

Vinci Family

John K, Steve Worth and Margaret Vinci


Carlo Vinci was a remarkable artist. He received classical art training at the National Academy of Design in 1930. He joined Paul Terry’s Terry-Toons soon after, and worked there for twenty years. He came West to join Joe Barbera at MGM, and ended up as the lead animator at H-B for twenty more years. But as I learned at my visit, those great achievements were only a small part of his story. In addition to cartooning, Vinci was an all-around fine artist, adept at oil painting, watercolor, illustration, stained glass and sculpture… in a variety of styles, from classical to baroque to art deco… with a wide range of subjects- still lifes, portraiture, landscapes and religious subjects. It was a mind blowing experience to discover the depth of talent behind a cartoonist we thought we already knew.

Vinci Family

Carlo Vinci’s son, Paul and grandson, John
with John K in front of Vinci’s self-portrait

After we had viewed all the amazing artwork, Mrs. Vinci invited us to enjoy some home made Italian desserts with her family. Excited by everything we had seen, we had plenty of questions about Carlo and his wonderful career as an artist. We asked if she had met him before he started working for Terry-Toons or after, and she replied, "He was working for Mr. Terry when I met him. When we were courting, he lived in the Bronx, and I lived in Brooklyn. It was a long trip across town to meet for our date every Wednesday evening. Carlo would send me a little note with a cartoon every day in the mail when we couldn’t be together. I’ve saved them all these years, but I don’t suppose you would be interested in seeing them…"

Naturally, we were! Her son, Paul Vinci helped her to retrieve the hundreds of letters from a closet- all on Terry animation paper in envelopes with the distinctive Terry-Toons logo. Dating from 1938 to 1939, these charming little notes had a personal message, along with brilliant drawings depicting Terry characters. Paul commented that he himself hadn’t seen the letters since he was very small; and even then, his mother only shared one or two with him. They had been bundled away carefully for over fifty years. Mrs. Vinci has kindly allowed us to share these drawings with you…

Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons

All of us at Animation Resources appreciate Mrs. Vinci’s generosity. Paul and John Vinci will be printing out this post and sharing it with her, so you can thank her yourself in the comments below.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Animated CartoonsAnimated Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Animation.

Wednesday, May 21st, 2014

Animation: Terrytoons Studio Tour 1939

Terry Production Process

Carlo Vinci and Connie Rasinski

Terry Production Process

Bill Weiss, Paul Terry, unknown, Larry Silverman, Carlo Vinci

Recently, the family of the legendary animator, Carlo Vinci lent us two 8mm films to transfer for the archive. I’ll post about the other one soon, but today I have a special treat for you… a color film outlining the animation production process from Terrytoons in 1939!

Here are frame grabs of most of the people appearing in this short. If you can identify anyone, please let us know in the comments below.

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Animator Carlo Vinci

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Story Man Larry Silverman

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Story Man Tommy Morrison

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Music Director Phil Scheib and Director Connie Rasinski

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Animator Jim Whipp and his assistant

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Makin’ Em Move (Terry/1939)
(Quicktime 7 / 30.7 megs)

Here is the cartoon we see the artists working on in this film…

Terrytoons Harvest Time

Terrytoons Harvest Time

Terrytoons Harvest Time

Terrytoons Harvest Time

Harvest Time (Terry/1940)
(Quicktime 7 / 13.8 megs)

Mike Fontanelli shares this great collection of Terry-Toons lobby cards with us…

Terrytoons Lobby Card
Terrytoons Lobby Card
Terrytoons Lobby Card
Terrytoons Lobby Card
Terrytoons Lobby Card
Terrytoons Lobby Card
Terrytoons Lobby Card
Terrytoons Lobby Card

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Animated CartoonsAnimated Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Animation.