July 30th, 2015

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Comic Books: Harvey Kurtzman’s Funny Animal Comic Books

Kurtzman Comic Books

Today, Kent Butterworth stopped by on his lunch break to watch Terry Bears cartoons featuring eye popping Jim Tyer animation. I realized that it’s been a while since I posted any comic book scans from Kent’s great collection of golden age funny animal comics. I’m righting that wrong right now with some great examples by Harvey Kurtzman. Enjoy! (Thanks Kent!)

Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books

Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books

Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books
Kurtzman Comic Books

Animator Michael Sporn has shared a tremendous pile of Kurtzman comic collaborations with Jack Davis. Check them out!

Kurtzman and Davis: Part One / Part Two / Part Three / Part Four / Part Five / Part Six

RECOMMENDED BOOK

 Harvey Kurtzman: Mad Genius

Harvey Kurtzman had a Midas touch for talent, but was himself an astonishingly talented and influential artist, writer, editor, and satirist. The creator of MAD and Playboy’s “Little Annie Fanny” was called, “One of the most important figures in postwar America” by the New York Times. Kurtzman’s groundbreaking “realistic” war comics of the early ’50s and various satirical publications (MAD, Trump, Humbug, and Help!) had an immense impact on popular culture, inspiring a generation of underground cartoonists. Without Kurtzman, it’s unlikely we’d have had Airplane, SNL, or National Lampoon. This definitive book includes hundreds of never-before-seen illustrations, paintings, pencil sketches, newly discovered lost E.C. Comics layouts, color compositions, illustrated correspondence, and vintage photos from the rich Kurtzman archives

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Comic BooksComic Books

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Comic Books.

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Posted by admin @ 1:47 pm

July 29th, 2015

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Animation: Ray Patterson At Mintz

Ray Patterson at Mintz

Ray Patterson’s career in animation spanned seven decades. He was responsible for the animation of Jerry Mouse dancing with Gene Kelly in Anchors Aweigh as well as animation for Dumbo and the "Pastoral" sequence of Fantasia. In 1954 he formed his own studio Grantray-Lawrence and he worked at Hanna-Barbera and Sanrio Productions as well.

Today, his family is sharing some of his earliest work with us… Ray began as an inker in 1929 at the Charles Mintz Screen Gems studio, working on Krazy Kat and Scrappy cartoons. By 1930, he had worked his way up to a position as animator. Here are some rare sketches and model sheets from his tenure there… Enjoy!

Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz
Ray Patterson at Mintz

Many thanks to the family of Ray Patterson for sharing these treasures with us.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Animated CartoonsAnimated Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Animation.

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Posted by admin @ 1:40 pm

July 28th, 2015

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Animation History: Clair Weeks- Pioneer of Indian Animation

The Banyan Deer

Today I am presenting an interesting bit of history from the collection of Disney animator, Clair Weeks along with an exciting update since we last featured this topic. Read on for details…

Clair WeeksClair WeeksClair Weeks was born in India, the son of a Methodist missionary- a source of humor for his co-workers at Disney. (See caricature, right.) He spent 16 years at the Disney Studios, working on Snow White, Bambi and Peter Pan. In 1956, Weeks travelled to Bombay, India on the invitation of Information Films of India to set up and train the country’s first animation studio as part of the American Technical Co-Operation Mission. What started as a one year project expanded into almost a decade of service abroad working for the US Agency for International Development. Weeks toured Southeast Asia and headed up a communitactions office in Katmandu, Nepal. He made films and audio-visual programs that aided in the social development and economic growth of third world countries.

I know very little about Weeks’ work in India, but a scrapbook donated to Animation Resources by his family provides some tantilizing clues. I contacted the chapter of ASIFA in India asking if they had any information on Weeks, and the Vice President of ASIFA-India, Prasad responded…

The studio Weeks helped to train some animators for was the Films Division of India (FDI). The stint of Clair’s there apparently lasted for about 18 months, during which they made a film called The Banyan Deer. I spoke to Rammohan, who was one of the students in 1956, and is generally acknowledged as one of the father figures of Indian animation to get these details. Clair apparently also taught in the late sixties or early seventies at the National Institute of Design in Ahmedabad. One of the students at that point, Nina Sabnani heads the Animation Department there now.

Since this article was last posted, my friend Steve Stanchfield has transferred a rare 16mm film showing Weeks at work at FDI in India. It’s fascinating to see behind the scenes in the earliest days of Indian animation.

Clair Weeks In India
Cartoon Division of FDI (FDI/1956)
(Quicktime 7 / 13.8 megs)

Here are some scans from Weeks’ Indian scrapbook. If anyone has any information on the film or the people in the photos, let me know in the comments below and I will add it to this post.

THE BANYAN DEER (1957) STORYBOARD

Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer
Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer
Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer
Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer
Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer

TREND MAGAZINE ARTICLE

Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer
Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer
Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer

PRODUCTION PHOTOS

Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer

19 April, 1958: Sitting: S.L. Badami (Deputy Chief Producer), Ezra Mir (Chief Producer), Clair Weeks (Key Animator Instructor), Dr. B.V. Keskar (Union Minister for Information & Broadcasting), D.L. Kothari (Controller of Administration). Standing behind: G.K. Maharesh (Production Manager), G.K. Gokhale (Animator), S.M. Junnarkar (Editor), G.H. Saraiya (in dark pants, Director)

Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer
Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer
Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer
Clair Weeks In India The Banyan De  er
Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer

19 April, 1958: D.L. Kothari, Clair Weeks, Dr. B.V. Keskar, Ezra Mir. Behind: H.R. Doraiswamy (Camera Assistant), S.S. Varma (Animation Cameraman)

Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer
Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer
Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer
Clair Weeks In India The Banyan Deer

Many thanks to the family of Clair Weeks for sharing this important material with us, and thanks to Steve Stanchfield of Thunderbean Animation for transferring the film footage.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Animated CartoonsAnimated Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Animation.

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