December 7th, 2018

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Comic Strips: Chic Young’s Blondie

Chic Young Blondie

Chic Young was one of the most successful newspaper cartoonists of his time. His first syndicated strip, Dumb Dora ran from 1924 to 1930. He retired the strip to create a "pretty girl" comic (ala Polly & her Pals) titled Blondie. It was an instant hit. Young penned Blondie until his death in 1973. The strip is still in print, under the byline of his son, Dean.

Chic Young's Blondie

The other day, Animation Resources supporter Joe Campana stopped by for a visit. He brought along a book for us to digitize… Comics And Their Creators was written by Martin Sheridan in 1942. It’s a treasure trove of biographical information on great comic strip artists. Today, I am presenting the chapter on Chic Young, along with some rare original Sunday pages from the collection of Marc Crisafulli.

Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie

Here are some of the very earliest Blondie Sunday pages…

Chic Young's Blondie
July 19th, 1931

Chic Young's Blondie
August 9th, 1931

Chic Young's Blondie
August 16th, 1931

Chic Young's Blondie
August 23rd, 1931

Chic Young's Blondie
September 6th, 1931

Many thanks to Marc Crisafulli for sharing these rare original comics pages with us; and to Joe Campana of Animation Who And Where for lending us Comics And Their Creators.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Newspaper ComicsNewspaper Comics
This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Newspaper Comics.

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Posted by admin @ 1:01 pm

December 6th, 2018

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Animation: Terrytoons Studio Tour 1939

Terry Production Process

Carlo Vinci and Connie Rasinski

Terry Production Process

Bill Weiss, Paul Terry, unknown, Larry Silverman, Carlo Vinci

Recently, the family of the legendary animator, Carlo Vinci lent us two 8mm films to transfer for the archive. I’ll post about the other one soon, but today I have a special treat for you… a color film outlining the animation production process from Terrytoons in 1939!

Here are frame grabs of most of the people appearing in this short. If you can identify anyone, please let us know in the comments below.

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Animator Carlo Vinci

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Story Man Larry Silverman

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Story Man Tommy Morrison

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Music Director Phil Scheib and Director Connie Rasinski

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Animator Jim Whipp and his assistant

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Terrytoons Makin Em Move

Makin’ Em Move (Terry/1939)
(Quicktime 7 / 30.7 megs)

Here is the cartoon we see the artists working on in this film…

Terrytoons Harvest Time

Terrytoons Harvest Time

Terrytoons Harvest Time

Terrytoons Harvest Time

Harvest Time (Terry/1940)
(Quicktime 7 / 13.8 megs)

Mike Fontanelli shares this great collection of Terry-Toons lobby cards with us…

Terrytoons Lobby Card
Terrytoons Lobby Card
Terrytoons Lobby Card
Terrytoons Lobby Card
Terrytoons Lobby Card
Terrytoons Lobby Card
Terrytoons Lobby Card
Terrytoons Lobby Card

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Animated CartoonsAnimated Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Animation.

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Posted by admin @ 12:53 pm

December 5th, 2018

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Animation: Ralph Bakshi’s Last Days of Coney Island on YouTube

Ralph Bakshi gave all of us the advice to make our own films using the technology available to us, and not feel like we couldn’t do it without a studio behind us. He didn’t just give advice, he took it himself. Last Days of Coney Island is the most intensely personal film Ralph has ever made, and that’s saying something. It looks like no film that has ever been made before. Everyone who animates should study this film carefully and follow Ralph’s example.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ri4iphUqShM

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Posted by Stephen Worth @ 1:02 am