Archive for the ‘refpack’ Category

Monday, April 25th, 2022

RefPack045: A Peek At The International Section

People who aren’t members of Animation Resources don’t understand how comprehensive our Reference Packs are. Over the next couple of weeks, we will be posting what each section of our current RefPack looks like. If you are a member of Animation Resources, click on this post to go to the Members Only page. If you aren’t a member yet, today is the perfect time to join! Our current Reference Pack is one of our best yet, and General and Student Members get access to a special Bonus Archive with even more material from past Reference Packs.

What are you waiting for?
Download Page
JOIN TODAY!
https://animationresources.org/membership/levels/

REFPACK045: April / May 2022

International Animation

EThe world of animation is much bigger than it might appear to us at first glance. We are all familiar with the films we grew up with, but Hollywood wasn’t the only place that produced great cartoons… Poland, Japan, Russia, China and Europe all have their own traditions and a rich history of animated film making. Animation Resources’ archive contains many foreign films that are rarely seen in the United States. We feature a sampling of interesting animation from around the world in each Reference Pack.

SD VIDEO:
Winnie The Pooh

Winnie The Pooh episode 01
Download Page
Fyodor Khitruk / Soyuzmultfilm, Russia / 1969
Download this article

In previous Reference Packs, we shared Roman Davydov’s series of films based on Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book. Davydov’s series was produced independently of Disney’s version. This time, we have the first episode of a similar set of films, Fyodor Khitruk’s “Winnie The Pooh”. Like the Russian Mowgli films, this series is quite different than the Disney version. Khitruk omits Christopher Robin and focuses solely on Winnie the Pooh and his friends. He said that he made this choice because he didn’t want the characters to be subordinate to a human character; and comparing the “Little Black Rain Cloud” sequence, it’s clear that Khitruk’s choice was a good one. On a visit to California, Khitruk paid a visit to the Disney Studios where he met Woolie Reitherman, the director who had won an Oscar for Disney’s version of “Winnie The Pooh”. Reitherman admitted to Khitruk that he liked Khitruk’s films better than his own.

Winnie The Pooh

The story of the first short film in the series follows the same plot as Disney’s first Winnie The Pooh film… “Winnie The Pooh And The Honey Tree”. If you have seen that film, you will have no problem following along, even if you don’t speak Russian. Like the Disney film, Pooh makes up little songs and tries unsuccessfully to fool the bees. Instead of Christopher Robin, he is accompanied by Piglet, who is less timid than in the Disney films and makes a good partner to Pooh.

Winnie The Pooh

Although the pacing of the film is leisurely, the timing is still sharp. Khitruk focuses on “micro gags” and quick changes of expression that use personality to keep the audience engaged with the characters. The style is charming and disarmingly simple, much more in keeping with the spirit of the original book than Disney’s version. There were two more films made in this series. We will have the next one for you in RefPack 046.

REFPACK045: Winnie The Pooh Ep01
Download Page
MP4 Video File / SD / 10:08 / 160 MB Download
SD VIDEO:
Goal Goal

A Match Revenge
Download Page
Boris Dyozhkin / Soyuzmultfilm, Russia / 1968

In our last Reference Pack, we shared a film called “Goal! Goal!” from 1964. This time, we are sharing the sequel made four years later, “A Match Revenge”.

At Souyuzmultfilm in the late 1940s and 1950s, there was a stark division between animators and directors. Animators only animated. They had no say in the rest of the process. But in the 60s, largely due to the urging of Fyodor Khitruk, a new working method was introduced which involved the animators’ input from the very start. This led to what was called the “aesthetic switch”— films became more of a team effort and the designs became streamlined and more animatable.

Goal Goal

Boris Dyozhkin had a three decade long career as a director and animator at Soyuzmultfilm. In his first couple of decades, he was an exception to the rule at Soyuzmultfilm. He animated extensively on his own shorts. This made for a total integration of staging, posing and action, as well as allowing for split second timing. “Goal! Goal!” was a great success for Dyozhkin, leading to a sequel called “A Match Revenge” in 1968, and a series of shorts dealing with soccer, track and field, and figure skating.

Goal Goal

This film has no dialogue and the action speaks for itself, so I won’t provide a detailed synopsis. The basic concept is that there are two opposing hockey teams: the Meteors and the Pennants. In “Goal! Goal!” the newcomers, the Pennants won in an upset over the defending champions, the Meteors. This film starts with the Meteors watching film of their humiliating defeat. They angrily vow revenge and challenge the Pennants to a rematch. The Meteors are agressive and determined to regain their title. They’ll do anything to win. All seems lost for the Pennants until… Watch to find out!

We think you are really going to find a lot to like this film. Like John Sibley’s animation in Disney’s Goofy sports cartoons, the action can be very extreme and still maintain perfect clarity.

REFPACK045: A Match Revenge (1968)
Download Page
MP4 Video File / SD / 20:22 / 796 MB Download
SD VIDEO:
Well Just You Wait

Well, Just You Wait Ep.04 “Sports Stadium”
Download Page
Vyacheslav Kotyonochkin / Soyuzmultfilm, Russia / 1970

We continue the Russian Wolf and Rabbit cartoons with episode 04, “Sports Arena”.

The premise of Nu, Pogodi! (which translates into English as Well, Just You Wait!) was pitched by a writing team of satirical humorists to many directors at Soyuzmultfilm, but was rejected every time. Finally in 1969, Gennady Sokolsky agreed to direct a 2 1/2 minute pilot for the series in an omnibus film called “Happy Merry Go Round”. The general consensus at the studio was that the cartoon was “low class” and beneath the dignity of Soyuzmultfilm, but director Vyacheslav Kotyonochkin strongly believed in the concept, so the studio decided to take a chance and allow him to direct a few episodes… and then a few more… and then more.

Well Just You Wait

Kotyonochkin was proven correct. The cartoons were a huge success. Between 1969 and 2006, Soyuzmultfilm ended up making 22 episodes, and in a 2014 poll of audiences all over Russia, Well, Just You Wait! was voted the most popular cartoon series of all time by a landslide. Although the series resembles both Tom & Jerry and the Roadrunner and Coyote series, the director, Kotyonochkin claimed not to have ever seen any of these Hollywood cartoons until 1987 when his son got a video tape recorder and Western tapes began to be imported.

Well Just You Wait

In these Russian cartoons, there’s almost no dialogue, and the action almost always occurs on screen. Static tableaux are rare, as are detailed backgrounds and “on model” drawings. These cartoons focus on expressive poses and movement, and save time and expense by avoiding the careful cleanup required for character model details and overlapping action. The theory here is, if it moves funny, it’s funny… and they are right about that.

Shamus Culhane once lamented that television animation consisted of mostly lip-sync animation. He would have preferred to do away with lip-sync entirely and just have simple drawings that really move. Well, Just You Wait proves that he was correct.

We will have more Wolf and Rabbit cartoons in upcoming Reference Packs.

REFPACK045: Well Just You Wait Ep. 04
Download Page
MP4 Video File / SD / 08:58 / 131 MB Download
SD VIDEO:
Pies Kot I

Dog, Cat And… Ep 4 “Refrigerator”
Download Page
Zofia Oraczewska / Studio Miniatur Filmowych, Poland / 1972

In this Reference Pack, we are sharing another short cartoon from a series produced by Studio Miniatur Filmowych, Pies, Kot I… which translates to Dog, Cat And… This is a different sort of take on the Tom & Jerry model, with the opponents outsmarting each other instead of just chasing each other out of hate or hunger. There is more to the relationship between the characters than just rivalry. The relationship of the characters makes it easy to see how it relates to slapstick comedy teams like Laurel & Hardy and Fatty Arbuckle and Buster Keaton. The dog and cat are not just generic animals, but individual personalities with a dynamic relationship that is much more engaging than most “cat and mouse” or “dog and cat” cartoons.

Pies Kot I

These cartoons are almost devoid of dialogue with the focus on loose, funny animation. In fact, the drawings are often hilarious on their own, even removed from their context within the gag sequence. The facial expressions are well observed, and the poses employ clear silhouettes that form funny graphic shapes.

Well, Just You Wait!, and Dog, Cat And… both are very efficient at what they do. They could easily serve as a model for internet animation. The internet encourages repeat viewing more than television does. When you watch a dialogue driven cartoon on TV, once you’ve heard the jokes, you don’t need to watch it again. However, a short cartoon that looks and moves funny is entertaining no matter how many times you watch it. And for the animator who is making the cartoon, it’s a lot more fun to animate simple funny characters than it is to animated a lot of tedious lip-sync.

Pies Kot I

Dog, Cat And… looks like it was a lot of fun to make. The film makers at Studio Miniatur Filmowych didn’t feel constrained by the ordinary lives of animals. Their characters can drive cars, build their own houses and go to exotic places. That freedom allowed the animators to keep their series fresh, and gave them the opportunity to experiment within a 10 minute format. Simple drawings, funny movement and no rules… these are the kinds of series that would work well as episodic internet cartoons.

We will have more episodes from this series in upcoming Reference Packs.

REFPACK045: Dog Cat And… Ep04
Download Page
MP4 Video File / SD / 09:09 / 146 MB Download

Annual Report

Animation Resources is asking our membership to consider donating to help us establish a video podcasting studio to be able to present seminars, interviews and informal updates live streamed on YouTube and Facebook. Our goal is for 25 of our members and supporters to donate $100. If you donate $100, we will provide you with a coupon code for a free membership to give as a gift to a friend or peer, or we can credit your donation to sponsor two students for a one year student membership.

By helping others, you help yourself.

Please consider donating using the PayPal Donate Button below. For more information on our Video Podcasting Fundraiser, see the 2022 President’s Message.

PayPalAnimationAnimation Resources depends on your contributions to support its projects. Even if you can’t afford to donate $100 or join our group right now, please click the button below to donate whatever you can afford using PayPal. Every little bit helps.


FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Friday, April 15th, 2022

RefPack045: A Peek At The Featured Downloads

People who aren’t members of Animation Resources don’t understand how comprehensive our Reference Packs are. Over the next couple of weeks, we will be posting what each section of our current RefPack looks like, starting today with the Featured section. If you are a member of Animation Resources, click on this post to go to the Members Only page. If you aren’t a member yet, today is the perfect time to join! Our current Reference Pack is one of our best yet, and General and Student Members get access to a special Bonus Archive with even more material from past Reference Packs.

What are you waiting for?
Download Page
JOIN TODAY!
https://animationresources.org/membership/levels/

Reference Pack

Every other month, Animation Resources shares a new Reference Pack with its members. They consist of an e-book packed with high resolution scans and video downloads set up for still frame study. Make sure you download the Reference Pack before it’s updated. When it’s gone, it’s gone!

REFPACK045: April / May 2022
PDF E-BOOK:
Daimyo Procession

Famous Pictures Of The Daimyo Procession
Download Page
Toko’en Publishing / Akiyoshi Zentaro, editor (1918)
Download this article

From the 17th to the 19th century, an art form flourished in Japan in isolation from the rest of the world. It was a specialized form of woodblock printing called Ukiyo-e. Today, we look at these prints and recognize the beauty of composition, color and design which derived from Chinese painting techniques. But there’s more to this art than meets the eye.

Understanding the cultural background to the title, reveals a great deal about the spirit behind the art. “Uki-yo” was a Buddhist term, meaning “sad world”, and “Ukiyo-e” is a play on words, literally translating to “floating world”. The entertainment district in the city of Edo (now known as Tokyo) was surrounded by a moat filled with water. At night, the bars, Kabuki theaters, restaurants and brothels were lit up and appeared to be floating on the water. So it became known by the nickname “the floating world”. The world of Buddhist monks might be sad, but not the floating world of Edo.

Woodblock prints depicted the things people could see in the floating world, so the term Ukiyo-e came to be applied to them too. These were pictures of famous Kabuki actors that people collected to follow their favorite stars, much like Hollywood movie magazines in the 40s and 50s. The prints also depicted beautiful waitresses at restaurants and famous concubines.

Daimyo Procession

From the 10th century to the middle of the 19th century, Japan was divided up into vast hereditary territories ruled by feudal lords called the daimyo. Above them were the military leaders, known as the shogun, and the emperor and his court in Kyoto. The daimyo held military and police powers within their districts, as well as collecting taxes and wielding economic control. The daimyo hired samurai warriors to defend their land holdings.

The shogun wanted to prevent the daimyo from revolting and taking power away from them or the emperor, so they set a law requiring them to live in Kyoto where they could keep close watch on them. In a sense, they were keeping the lord and his family hostage to insure that they wouldn’t try to usurp power. The daimyo appointed relatives to represent them in their home province and conduct business. There were battles between daimyo clans, seeking to enlarge their land holdings; between the clans and samurai, who wanted independence from the control of the daimyo; and between daimyo in Kyoto and their representatives in their territories.

Eventually, it became impossible for the daimyo to spend all of their time at the emperor’s court, so the law was amended to allow them to spend alternate years in their territories and at the shogun court in Edo. So every other year, the feudal lord was required to gather up his family, his possessions, his samurai and his retainers and travel across Japan to the city of Edo. There were about 250 daimyo clans in all, so the main road from one end of Japan to the other, called the Tokaido Road, would often have ceremonial processions where an entire feudal court would travel the length of the road in parade formation. The lords tried to outdo each other with pomp and displays of their wealth and power, and the lower classes who witnessed the parade were required to step aside and bow, letting the procession go by.

Daimyo Procession

The daimyo procession was a popular subject for ukiyo-e prints over the years, and in 1918 publisher Toko’en hired editor Akiyoshi Zentaro to create a compilation book titled “Well Known Pictures Of The Daimyo Procession”. Animation Resources obtained a first edition printing of this book, and although it is lithography, not hand carved woodblock printing, the image quality is remarkable. The artists represented in this book include many of the major names in ukiyo-e, including Hiroshige, Toyokuni and Yoshitoshi.

REFPACK045: Daimyo Procession
Download Page
PDF / 106 Pages / 449 MB Download

SD VIDEO:
Screen Songs

Two Screen Songs Shorts
Download Page
She’ll Be Coming’ Round The Mountain (1949) / Base Brawl (1948)

I had a request from a member to share some cartoons from the Famous Studios. I understand why he wanted to see some of these cartoons. Famous cartoons have been out of circulation for a very long time, and the copies on YouTube are poor quality prints. I hesitate to share certain things, because pointing out what is worthy of study in them requires a lot of explanation. The truth is that after the first few years of the studio, Famous settled into a rut of formulaic banality that it never escaped from. There are an awful lot of bad things in these cartoons. But even the worst cartoons from the golden age have something to teach us. So here are a pair of Screen Songs by Famous Studios, “She’ll Be Coming Round The Mountain”. and “Base Brawl”.

Screen Songs
Screen Songs

When I was a kid, I remember seeing Screen Songs on TV. They always elicited groans from me and my friends. They consisted of a bunch of random gags strung together without a story, the jokes were completely devoid of humor, and a sizable chunk of the cartoon was taken up by a bouncing ball sing-along. If you’ve ever seen a sing-along with a live audience, you know they can be a lot of fun. It doesn’t matter how well you can sing. There’s no reason to be embarrassed, because the lights are off and no one can see you. Inevitably, there are people in the crowd singing harmony, making the massed voices sound even better. When the song ends, there is a feeling in the audience that everyone has just participated in something special. In fact, sing-alongs were one of the first forms of interactive entertainment. But on television, they are something else altogether. Only a dolt would sing along with a television set. When these sequences were shown on TV, kids weren’t excited to participate, they were just waiting for the segment to be over, so the cartoon could come back.

Screen Songs
Screen Songs

However, the format of these cartoons isn’t their biggest problem. The real problem is that these cartoons are undirected and poorly written. They contain some great animation and timing, but the cartoons themselves are poorly presented. Gags don’t build to a climax. It’s just one unmotivated gag after another to fill time until the seven minutes runs out. The gags themselves consist of low grade humor— visual puns and obvious exaggerations. The songs are old fashioned and the situations are stereotypical and trite. All in all, there’s a good reason why these cartoons still elicit groans.

Screen Songs

When I present cartoons like these, I feel compelled to remind you that at Animation Resources, we don’t just share perfect examples of artistic creation. Some of the material we share is old fashioned or have objectionable content, like ethnic stereotyping. Others are poor on one level, but they might have other redeeming features that are well done and worthy of study. We expect our readers to be willing to parse and break down the things we share, rejecting the junk and identifying the good. That said, what is it in these cartoons that is good? Well, Famous Studios had some excellent animators. Others are better at identifying individual animators by their work than I am, but I’ll point out some scenes that would be worth your time to still frame through and analyze…

Screen Songs

“She’ll Be Coming Round The Mountain” has a few scenes with fun and appealing animation. At 3:06, a cat fires a rifle then tiptoes around a tree to take a drink out of a bottle of moonshine. The payoff to the gag isn’t at all funny, but the scene is animated funny. You laugh at how the cat moves, not the joke. The closeup of the cat putting the dynamite in the bone is the same. Again, the setup is more appealing than the payoff. “Base Brawl” is even better. Take a look at the scene of the elephant pitching beginning at 1:13. Still frame through the scene and note how the volumes shift as the elephant winds up and pitches. His weight transfers from one foot to the other. The camera pans to accentuate the momentum, and the arms become simplified curves to clarify the action. Also note how the trunk is animated to follow through with the pitch as overlapping action. Throughout the cartoon, there are variations on this basic pitch. Each one is interesting. Even better is the scene at 3:22 where the elephant is running the bases. There is a great feeling of weight and momentum in the run, and the poses transition from one to another smoothly, not snap to pose like it would be handled in a Tex Avery cartoon.

REFPACK045: She’ll Be Coming Round The Mountain
Download Page
MP4 Video File / SD / 06:57 / 123 MB Download

REFPACK045: Base Brawl
Download Page
MP4 Video File / SD / 07:54 / 111 MB Download

SD VIDEO:
Linus The Lionhearted

Linus The Lionhearted s02e02
Download Page
Irv Spector / Ed Graham Productions / 1964

Linus the Lionhearted bears the dubious distinction of being the only Saturday Morning cartoon series to be cancelled because a law was passed against it! Read on, and I’ll explain…

In 1959, Linus the Lionhearted was created by the Ed Graham Agency as the mascot for Post’s “Heart of Oats” cereal. The character proved to be more popular than the cereal. Not long after its introduction, Linus was reassigned to represent “Crispy Critters”. The earliest commercials featuring the character were animated by Robert McKimson, but the character was redesigned in 1964 and joined a group of other Post mascots: Sugar Bear, Lovable Truly, Rory Raccoon and So-Hi in a television series which debuted the following year.

Linus The Lionhearted

The series included the best of the best in the business… The voice cast included Sheldon Leonard, Carl Reiner, Ruth Buzzi, and Bob McFadden. And guest voice actors included Stiller and Meara, Jonathan Winters and Jesse White. The theme songs and underscore were by Johnny Mann, whose music for The Alvin Show was so distinctive. The art department was led by Irv Spector, with support from T. Hee, Bob Kurtz, Osmand Evans, Ted Bonnicksen, Lee Mishkin, Corny Cole, Cal Howard, Manny Gould, Ken Hultgren, Virgil Ross, Rudy Zamora, Amby Paliwoda and Bob Givens, among others.

Linus The Lionhearted

Creating a television series starring cereal mascots was an ingenious idea. Post bought out the advertising time for the program and instead of cutting away from the show during commercial breaks, the characters simply reappeared selling cereal. To the viewer, the whole half hour seemed like a continuous television program. To the FCC however, it felt like a half hour long commercial. In 1969, the FCC ruled that children’s show characters were no longer allowed to appear in commercials running with the same program in which they appeared. This eliminated Walter Lantz and Hanna Barbera’s Kellogg’s commercials during their shows, as well as puppet show host Captain Kangaroo’s contract with Crayola crayons.

Television animation has been severely limited over the years by FCC regulation. But these rules don’t apply on the internet. The lines between advertisement and program can be totally blurred in web cartoons. This keeps the audience engaged, and prevents them from tuning out commercials. For some reason, many people on YouTube adhere to the format of television advertising, even though they aren’t required to. If you create animation for the internet, you might want to consider integrating your content and advertising into a single uninterrupted unit. The audience will be more entertained, and you will sell more products.

REFPACK045: Linus The Lionhearted
Download Page
MP4 Video File / SD / 28:46 / 416 MB Download

Many thanks to Animation Resources Advisory Board Member Steve Stanchfield for sharing these rare Famous Studios and Linus The Lionhearted films with us.

Annual Report

Animation Resources is asking our membership to consider donating to help us establish a video podcasting studio to be able to present seminars, interviews and informal updates live streamed on YouTube and Facebook. Our goal is for 25 of our members and supporters to donate $100. If you donate $100, we will provide you with a coupon code for a free membership to give as a gift to a friend or peer, or we can credit your donation to sponsor two students for a one year student membership.

By helping others, you help yourself.

Please consider donating using the PayPal Donate Button below. For more information on our Video Podcasting Fundraiser, see the 2022 President’s Message.

PayPalAnimationAnimation Resources depends on your contributions to support its projects. Even if you can’t afford to donate $100 or join our group right now, please click the button below to donate whatever you can afford using PayPal. Every little bit helps.


FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Friday, April 1st, 2022

LAST CALL! RefPack044: More Than Ever Before As A Thank You To Our Members

YOU MISSED IT! The new RefPack is available now. Click on MEMBERS CLICK HERE to check it out.

Reference Pack

Every other month, Animation Resources shares a new Reference Pack with its members. They consist of e-books packed with high resolution scans video downloads of rare animated films set up for still frame study, as well as podcasts and documentaries— all designed to help you become a better artist. Make sure you download this Reference Pack before it’s updated. When it’s gone, it’s gone!


MEMBERS LOGIN To Download

JOIN TODAY To Access Members Only Content


Our members are responsible for making everything at Animation Resources possible. Every February, we set aside time to thank them and invite more people to join. This year, we are pulling out all the stops to make RefPack044 the biggest and best one yet. This one RefPack is worth the entire year’s dues! Here’s a quick overview of what you’ll find when you log in to the members only page…

OMealia Sport Cartoons

First up is a new e-book on a cartoonist you probably haven’t heard of before— Leo O’Mealia. He was a sports cartoonist for The New York Daily News in the 1950s. He wasn’t syndicated as widely as his contemporary, Willard Mullin, so he is largely forgotten today. But he was an amazing artist with an animator’s eye for breaking down action into exaggerated key poses.

UPA Trees Jamaica Daddy

Next up is a pair of short films by U.P.A. courtesy of our Advisory Board Member, Steve Stanchfield. The reputation of U.P.A. was built upon its simple, modern style. It reflected the tastes of the early 1950s by adopting elements of contemporary art and sophisticated cartooning from magazines like Esquire and The New Yorker.

UPA Pink And Blue Blues

The films produced by the studio looked and sounded nothing like the products of any other studio at the time. The two examples we are sharing show how unique U.P.A’s films were.

Mowgli

In our International section, we conclude the five part Russian animated feature based on Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book. Directed by Roman Davydov independently of Disney’s version, the film takes a much darker and more serious approach to the story than Disney’s version. It’s notable for some superhuman animation and brilliant draftsmanship.


MEMBERS LOGIN To Download

JOIN TODAY To Access Members Only Content


Mr Wolf

Next up is a Russian propaganda film titled "Mr. Wolf". Even though it was produced in isolation behind the Iron Curtain, it resembles the simplified style of the late 40s Columbia cartoons and Halas & Bachelor’s Animal Farm.

Peter And Red Riding Hood

Also from Russia is a gentle satire called "Peter And Little Red Riding Hood". At the time this film was being made, Soyuzmultfilm had reached a peak with its hand drawn and puppet animation. It exhibits tremendous style and draftsmanship. The personality animation of the main character Peter stands out through well observed gestures and specific types of walks. Milt Kahl couldn’t have done better.

Goal Goal

Continuing in the International section, we feature a film called "Goal! Goal!" which is a perfect integration of design, staging, posing and timing. Created by Boris Dyozhkin in 1964, this was part of a series of films on sports by Soyuzmultfilm.

Koziolek Matolek

Next up is another episode of Koziolek Matolek produced by Studio Miniatur Filmowych in Krakow, Poland. The focus is on funny movement and expressions, all while maintaining an admirable level of clarity and economy. This series is a model of what web cartoons could be.

Kaibutsu-Kun

Then in our Early Anime section, curator JoJo Baptista shares two rare half hours of Japanese TV animation. Kaibutsu-Kun is a series about a boy named Tarou Kaibutsu and his monster friends, Dracula, Wolfman and Franken.

Gutsy Frog

Gutsy Frog is a series from the mid 1970s which has some fascinating spacing and timing theories that haven’t been seen much in Western animation.


MEMBERS LOGIN To Download

JOIN TODAY To Access Members Only Content


Charlie Chaplin

In our Slapstick section, we conclude the three part documentary on Charlie Chaplin called "The Unknown Chaplin". In this episode the focus is on Chaplin’s feature film work, and there are several fascinating reconstructions of sequences to show how Chaplin developed his stories and gags.

Die Muskete

We’ve just updated our Annual Member Bonus Archive! Only General and Student members have access to this. If you are a quarterly member, you will want to consider upgrading to an annual membership to get access. This time, we are featuring a Viennese caricature journal from 1910 with some amazing illustrations.

Comedy A Serious Business

Also in the Bonus Archive is a fantastic documentary on Slaptick comedy produced by the BBC. This documentary has been unavailable for many years and it includes interviews with major silent film comedians.

Felix The Cat

Rounding out the downloads in the Bonus Archive are a pair of cartoons featuring Felix the Cat. Feline Follies was the very first Felix cartoon, and Felix Dines and Pines includes some amazingly surreal sequences. Log in to the Annual Member Bonus Archive to access these three downloads.

Weight

And that’s not all! Animation Resources Board Member, David Eisman shares breakdowns on the theme of Perspective Turns. David breaks this complex technique down to its nuts and bolts and helps you understand when to use (and most importantly, NOT use!) moving camera shots.

Animated Discussions Podcast

And our Director of Programming, Davey Jarrell has a new Animated Discussions podcast for us all. This one features Educator Taber Dunipace and Producer Stephen Worth answering the question, "Is Using Reference Constructive Or A Crutch?" The crew outlines how reference can be used for both practical purposes and for feeding your creative spirit. You’ll definitely want to make time to listen to this one!

Whew! That is an amazing collection of treasures! At Animation Resources, our Advisory Board includes great artists and animators like Ralph Bakshi, Will Finn, J.J. Sedelmaier and Sherm Cohen. They’ve let us know the things that they use in their own self study so we can share them with you. That’s experience you just can’t find anywhere else. The most important information isn’t what you already know… It’s the information you should know about, but don’t know yet. We bring that to you every other month.

Haven’t Joined Yet?

Check out this SAMPLE REFERENCE PACK! It will give you a taste of what Animation Resources members get to download every other month!

Sample RefPack

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD A Sample RefPack!

Animation Resources is a 501(c)(3) non-profit arts organization dedicated to providing self study material to the worldwide animation community. If you are a creative person working in animation, cartooning or illustration, you owe it to yourself to be a member of Animation Resources.


MEMBERS LOGIN To Download

JOIN TODAY To Access Members Only Content


PayPalAnimationAnimation Resources depends on your contributions to support its projects. Even if you can’t afford to join our group right now, please click the button below to donate whatever you can afford using PayPal.


FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather