Archive for the ‘terrytoons’ Category

Wednesday, May 20th, 2020

Design: Terry-Toons’ Temperamental Lion

Today, we digitized some great Terrytoons model sheets that Carlo Vinci’s family loaned to us…

Terrytoons Model Sheet
Terrytoons Model Sheet
Terrytoons Model Sheet
Terrytoons Model Sheet
Terrytoons Model Sheet

This one is particularly interesting to me…

Terrytoons Model Sheet

…because it’s from one of the very best Terrytoons of the time, "The Temperamental Lion". Connie Rasinski created the goofy Bert Lahr lion character as the "King of the Jungle" for the classic cartoon "Doomsday" (1938) as well as "The Nutty Network" (1939). The model was adapted a bit in the late 1940s for "The Lyin’ Lion", a film that includes some funny Jim Tyer animation…

Terrytoons Model Sheet

…but the character was never better animated than he was by Carlo Vinci in this short… Check out his great scene of the lion singing!

Terrytoons Temperamental Lion
Terrytoons Temperamental Lion
Terrytoons Temperamental Lion
Terrytoons Temperamental Lion
Terrytoons Temperamental Lion
Terrytoons Temperamental Lion

The Temperamental Lion (Terry/1940)
(Quicktime 7 / 14.5 megs)

Many thanks to the Vinci family for sharing their treasures with us!

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Animated CartoonsAnimated Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Animation.

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Thursday, February 6th, 2020

Animation: Carlo Vinci Notes From Terry-Toons

Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons

Not long ago, archive assistant Amir Avni and I took a trip out to visit Carlo Vinci’s family at the home of his wife, Margaret. Mrs. Vinci graciously welcomed us into her home for a tour of her collection of artwork belonging to her late husband. Carlo’s animation desk, which he designed and built himself, still stands in his office just as he left it, with caricatures by co-workers hanging above it on the wall. Every room in the house has beautiful artwork filling the space. It was an awe inspiring experience to get a chance to see it all.

Carlo Vinci was a remarkable artist. He received classical art training at the National Academy of Design in 1930. He joined Paul Terry’s Terry-Toons soon after, and worked there for twenty years. He came West to join Joe Barbera at MGM, and ended up as the lead animator at H-B for twenty more years. But as I learned at my visit, those great achievements were only a small part of his story. In addition to cartooning, Vinci was an all-around fine artist, adept at oil painting, watercolor, illustration, stained glass and sculpture… in a variety of styles, from classical to baroque to art deco… with a wide range of subjects- still lifes, portraiture, landscapes and religious subjects. It was a mind blowing experience to discover the depth of talent behind a cartoonist we thought we already knew.

After we had viewed all the amazing artwork, Mrs. Vinci invited us to enjoy some home made Italian desserts with her family. Excited by everything we had seen, we had plenty of questions about Carlo and his wonderful career as an artist. We asked if she had met him before he started working for Terry-Toons or after, and she replied, "He was working for Mr. Terry when I met him. When we were courting, he lived in the Bronx, and I lived in Brooklyn. It was a long trip across town to meet for our date every Wednesday evening. Carlo would send me a little note with a cartoon every day in the mail when we couldn’t be together. I’ve saved them all these years, but I don’t suppose you would be interested in seeing them…"

Naturally, we were! Her son, Paul Vinci helped her to retrieve the hundreds of letters from a closet- all on Terry animation paper in envelopes with the distinctive Terry-Toons logo. Dating from 1938 to 1939, these charming little notes had a personal message, along with brilliant drawings depicting Terry characters. Paul commented that he himself hadn’t seen the letters since he was very small; and even then, his mother only shared one or two with him. They had been bundled away carefully for over fifty years. Mrs. Vinci has kindly allowed us to share these drawings with you…

Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons
Carlo Vinci at Terrytoons

All of us at Animation Resources appreciate the Vinci’s generosity. Since this article was originally posted, Mrs. Vinci has passed away. Amir and I will never forget her kindness and generosity.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Animated CartoonsAnimated Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Animation.

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Friday, January 24th, 2020

Animation: Nat Falk’s How To Make Animated Cartoons Part Three

Nat Falk Book

Here is the conclusion of Nat Falk’s "How To Make Animated Cartoons". This section contains lessons on how to draw animated cartoons and how to animate.

HOW TO DRAW ANIMATED CARTOONS

Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book

HOW TO ANIMATE

Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book
Nat Falk Book

Many thanks to the family of Carlo Vinci for sharing this important book with us.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Animated CartoonsAnimated Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Animation.
INSTRUCTIONINSTRUCTION

This posting is part of an online series of articles dealing with Instruction.

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