Archive for the ‘magazine’ Category

Wednesday, September 14th, 2016

Illustration: Milton Caniff and Norman Rockwell in Coronet

Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon

The Milton Caniff Estate recently loaned Animation Resources copies of two issues of Coronet magazine from 1942 and 1947 to digitize. Here are three articles of interest to cartoonists and illustrators…

Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon

AMERICA’S PIONEER JAP FIGHTER
By Howard Whitman

Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve CanyonMilton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon
Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon
Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon
Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve CanyonMilton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon
Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon
Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon

NORMAN ROCKWELL: The People’s Painter
By Jack H. Pollack

Norman Rockwell
Norman RockwellNorman Rockwell
Norman RockwellNorman Rockwell
Norman RockwellNorman Rockwell

CONFESSIONS OF A COMIC STRIP ARTIST
By Milton Caniff

Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon
Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve CanyonMilton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon
Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve CanyonMilton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon

Thanks to John Ellis and the estate of Milton Caniff for sharing this with us!

STEVE CANYON TV SHOW

Milton Caniff Steve Canyon
The Steve Canyon Special Edition DVD is out now! To order it and for more info on the Steve Canyon TV show, see… www.stevecanyondvd.blogspot.com

STEVE CANYON AT AMAZON

Milton Caniff BookOrder Steve CanyonOrder Steve CanyonFantagraphics has a great book on Caniff’s career, and Checker has released year by year reprints of the classic Steve Canyon strip. Caniff was a master storyteller, and the first few years of Steve Canyon are examples of his genius at the height of its powers. Click on the pictures for more info.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

IllustrationIllustration

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit spotlighting Illustration.
Newspaper ComicsNewspaper Comics
This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Newspaper Comics.

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016

Magazine Cartoons: Wally Wood in Mad

Notice the way they start some movies nowadays?… No title at the beginning… The movie starts right in with a scene…

Wally Wood in Mad magazine Brando Wild One
Wally Wood in Mad magazine Brando Wild One
Wally Wood in Mad magazine Brando Wild One
Wally Wood in Mad magazine Brando Wild One
Wally Wood in Mad magazine Brando Wild One
Wally Wood in Mad magazine Brando Wild One
Wally Wood in Mad magazine Brando Wild One
Wally Wood in Mad magazine Brando Wild One

Many thanks to Animation Resources supporter Amir Avni for this fantastic Wally Wood story, Wild 1/2 from Mad magazine (Sept. 1954).

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.

Tuesday, August 16th, 2016

Magazine Cartoons: What’s Wrong With This Picture?

What's Wrong With This Picture

My mother passed away a little over a year ago, and recently I’ve been going through some boxes of things she left behind. I found a book of crafts, games and puzzles from 1927 that must have been given to her when she was very young. It included these “What’s Wrong With This Picture?” cartoons by Joe McIntosh. They appear to be created as one panel magazine cartoons.

I don’t know anything about the artist, but this style of cartooning was very popular in the 20s. Just about every college newspaper and humor magazine had cartoons that looked very similar. The leading proponent of the simplified round head style was John Held Jr. Early Puppetoons by George Pal also had a similar feel. Although Joe McIntosh’s cartoons aren’t nearly as sophisticated as those of Held or Pal, they’re still very clever and fun.

Whenever I see straightforward, appealing cartoons like this, I wonder… Why are modern animation designs are so needlessly complex and realistic? And why are Flash characters so flat that it limits their ability to be posed? Here are cartoony, stylized designs that have volume and work well within the perspective of a three dimensional environment. These sorts of characters would be easy to animate expressively using just about any technique- hand drawn, CGI, puppet, clay or Flash. Naturally, the subject matter here is dated, but the basic proportions and shapes could easily be applied to a more modern context. I’d love to see contemporary cartoons that are this simple and fun again.

See how many mistakes you can spot!

WHAT’S WRONG WITH THIS PICTURE?

What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
How many mistakes did you count?

What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.