Biography: Phil Interlandi

This posting is a stub. You can contribute to this entry by providing information through the comments link at the bottom of this post. Please organize your information following the main category headers below….

Birth/Death

Occupation/Title

Bio Summary

One of America’s Most Enduring and Loved Cartoon Artist The following is a brief history of Phil Inerlandi,
father of the owner of Interlandi’s Pasta Casa.

Phil Interlandi was a veteran freelance magazine cartoonist whose work appeared in national magazines ranging from Look to Better Homes & Gardens but most notably in Playboy, where he was a mainstay for decades. He passed away in 2002 at 78.
A longtime resident of Laguna Beach, Calif., Interlandi sold his first cartoon to Playboy in 1955. “He had an acerbic wit,” said Michelle Urry, Playboy cartoon editor, adding that she had a batch of Interlandi’s latest submissions on her desk. “He just ran roughshod over all the sacred cows. He didn’t care about the taboos.”

“He was really just a marvelous artist,” said New Yorker cartoonist Sam Gross, who had known Interlandi for 30 years. “He also really knew how to draw good-looking girls and yet make the cartoon funny.”

The Chicago-born son of Sicilian immigrants, Interlandi showed artistic ability at an early age, as did his identical twin, Frank, who later became a syndicated political cartoonist for the Los Angeles Times.

Early Life/Family

Education/Training

Career Outline

One of America’s Most Enduring and Loved Cartoon Artist The following is a brief history of Phil Inerlandi,
father of the owner of Interlandi’s Pasta Casa.

Phil Interlandi was a veteran freelance magazine cartoonist whose work appeared in national magazines ranging from Look to Better Homes & Gardens but most notably in Playboy, where he was a mainstay for decades. He passed away in 2002 at 78.
A longtime resident of Laguna Beach, Calif., Interlandi sold his first cartoon to Playboy in 1955. “He had an acerbic wit,” said Michelle Urry, Playboy cartoon editor, adding that she had a batch of Interlandi’s latest submissions on her desk. “He just ran roughshod over all the sacred cows. He didn’t care about the taboos.”

“He was really just a marvelous artist,” said New Yorker cartoonist Sam Gross, who had known Interlandi for 30 years. “He also really knew how to draw good-looking girls and yet make the cartoon funny.”

The Chicago-born son of Sicilian immigrants, Interlandi showed artistic ability at an early age, as did his identical twin, Frank, who later became a syndicated political cartoonist for the Los Angeles Times.

Comments On Style

Influences

Personality

Anecdotes

Miscellaneous

Filmography

Honors

Related Links

Bibliographic References

BIO-AAA-347

Contributors To This Listing

Carla Interlandi Armstrong

To make additions or corrections to this listing, please click on COMMENTS below…

Comments