Archive for the ‘cartoonist’ Category

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

Sports Cartooning: Master of the Sports Page, Karl Hubenthal

Karl Hubenthal

Karl HubenthalKarl HubenthalBefore the development of high speed film stock and long telephoto lenses, newspapers’ sports pages were illustrated with cartoons, not photographs. To be perfectly honest, one baseball game looks pretty much like any other in still photos, so it was the job of the sports cartoonist to get across the spirit of the game in his drawings. Ozark collected clippings by the greatest of all sports cartoonists, Willard Mullin, as well as one I had never heard of before, Karl Hubenthal. Hubenthal drew for the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, and although I grew up in Los Angeles, my family subscribed to the L.A. Times. I had no idea that this genius cartoonist was working in my own hometown up into the 1980s. His cartoons have phenomenal energy and sense of humor as well as solid draftsmanship.

Bob Staake has created a fantastic website devoted to “Hubie”, as Karl Hubenthal was known to his friends. There’s a fascinating biography as well as a must-read article written by Hubenthal in 1966 titled, “Reflections of an Editorial Cartoonist”. You should take the time to click through and read these. Hubenthal’s career and philosophy are a model for young cartoonists. He studied under Herriman and Mullin, and considered himself part of the continuity of the history of cartooning that stretched back to Daumier, Gillray and Hogarth. There aren’t many cartoonists today with that sort of foundation in the history of their artform.

Here. courtesy of the clip file of Jack Ozark are some great examples of the work of Karl Hubenthal…

DALIES

Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal

SPECIAL EDITION COVERS

Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal

POLITICAL CARTOONS

Karl Hubenthal
Karl Hubenthal

There are a lot more great cartoons in the Ozark files. Let me know in the comments if you would like to see more.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Archive

Editorial CartoonsEditorial Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Editorial Cartoons.

Wednesday, April 29th, 2015

Comics: Rowland Emett- Cartoonist & Tinkerer

Rowland Emett

I’m discovering that during the late 1940s and through the 50s and 60s, there was a group of British cartoonists who paralleled the style of Ronald Searle. I’ve already profiled Trog and the Canadian cartoonist Len Norris. Today, I’m going to introduce you to another interesting artist… one who had the mechanical skills to build his own cartoon world.

Rowland EmettRowland Emett was born in London in 1906. His father was an amateur inventor and his grandfather was a prominent engraver. He showed aptitude in both engineering and art at a young age. He studied at the Birmingham School of Arts and Crafts, and was drafted into the military during World War II. Beginning in 1939, he joined the staff of Punch magazine, where he was free to create cartoons on whatever subject he wanted… Usually, that subject was trains.

The cartoons at the bottom of this post come from Punch in 1947. At this time, Punch was at the peak of its circulation- 175,000 copies a week. After the war, there was a determined effort to brush away the cobwebs from the preceding century and update the graphic look of the magazine. More modern cartoonists began to replace the old guard, and subject matter became more centered around the everyday life of the average Brit, rather than the political struggles of the upper classes. Rowland Emett’s mechanical whimsey fit perfectly within this new framework.

Rowland Emett

But Emett wasn’t content to limit himself to pen and ink. His urge to tinker took over in 1951 when he created the Far Tottering and Oyster Creek Branch Railway at Battersea Park for the Festival of Britain. Intended to lift the spirits of the British public, the Festival of Britain received mixed reviews. Sir Thomas Beecham described it as “a monumental piece of imbecility”. But at least it was entertaining imbecility thanks to Rowland Emett.

Rowland Emett

Built of mahogany and copper over the top of a 15 inch gauge diesel electric engine that Emett obtained from a war surplus supplier, the cartoony railway was a huge hit with the public and repaid the cost of designing and building it in just three weeks.

Rowland Emett

The main locomotive was named “Nellie” after the engine in his Punch cartoons. In the five months the festival operated, around 8 1/2 million people visited the park. A lot of the design ideas for kinetic sculptures at the Festival of Britain influenced Disneyland’s “imagineers”, in particular, with the design of the “Small World” attraction and the Casey Jones ride in Fantasyland.

Thanks to our reader, Matt Jones here are a few links to videos of newsreels about Emett and his creations… These videos are mind-blowing!

Rowland Emett

Emett went on to design “The Featherstone-Kite Openwork Basketweave Mark Two Gentleman’s Flying Machine”, two copies of which still exist. He designed a “Forget-Me-Not Computer” for Honeywell and acted as a production designer for the 1968 film, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. His last great kinetic work was the “Aqua Horological Tintinnabulator”, a water powered musical clock which still operates at the Victoria Center in Nottingham. Rowland Emett was awarded the Order of the British Empire in 1978 and passed away in 1990 at the age of 84.

During December of 2012, the Ontario Science Centre hosted an exhibit of Emett’s machines. Here is an amazing video of them in action by David Sweeney.

Enjoy these fantastic cartoons by one of Britain’s most interesting creators…

Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett
Rowland Emett

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.

Monday, March 9th, 2015

E-Book: H. M. Bateman’s Suburbia and Burlesques

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H M Bateman Suburbia and Burlesques

H. M. Bateman
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Suburbia (1922) & Burlesques (1916/1922)

H M Bateman Suburbia and BurlesquesH M Bateman Suburbia and BurlesquesBorn in 1887, H. M. Batman was already drawing for publication in his early teens. Astonishingly prolific and inventive, everything he saw became material, so that his work can be read as a social history of Britain in the first half of the 20th Century and, to an extraordinary degree, as a kind of autobiography. His style developed and changed radically over the years. From the graceful and rhythmical lines of his earlier work to the stark brilliance of his strip cartoons and the furious energy of his "Man Who…" series, his essential qualities of superb draughtsmanship, astonishing observation and a profound appreciation of humanity‚Äôs foibles, are always married to a wonderful wit and narrative perfection. He told marvellously funny stories in pictures.

This PDF e-book contains two complete cartoon books packed with hundreds of Bateman’s cartoons and caricatures, and includes a biography from HMBateman.com. This PDF e-book is optimized for display on the iPad or printing two up with a cover on 8 1/2 by 11 inch paper.

REFPACK003: H M BATEMAN PDF
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H M Bateman Suburbia and Burlesques
H M Bateman Suburbia and Burlesques
H M Bateman Suburbia and Burlesques
H M Bateman Suburbia and Burlesques
H M Bateman Suburbia and Burlesques


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