Archive for the ‘donate’ Category

Monday, October 14th, 2013

Exhibit: How To Draw Funny Pictures

Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures

Last week, I discussed Zim’s Cartoons and Caricatures. Here are some more examples of the genius of Eugene “Zim” Zimmerman from another vintage "how to" book… How To Draw Funny Pictures by E.C. Matthews. This chapter deals with a topic that is widely discussed today, racial stereotyping.

Ethnic humor was Zim’s stock-in-trade. He once joked that he and his fellow cartoonists at Puck magazine treated the various races and creeds that made up America with gloves… the kind boxers wear. Perhaps this is why he is virtually unknown today. But it’s unfair to sit like an armchair quarterback a century later judging an entirely different time by our own standards. Zim approached every person as a peer. He made fun of all of them equally.

Stereotypes are still part and parcel of caricature and cartooning. Pirates have eye patches and parrots on their shoulders. Surfer dudes wear baggy shorts and have long blonde hair. These are the generally understood symbols that represent specific types of people. How does a cartoonist utilize these common perceptions to communicate clearly while still remaining honest? Here is an important first-hand document of how Zim himself explained the purpose and limits of ethnic caricature in the "melting pot" of the early 20th Century.

Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures

Take note of this advice from the conclusion of this chapter…

Greatness makes one tolerant. Great men are not ashamed to stop on the street and talk to the man in overalls. They recognize the bond of friendship between the common people and themselves. The social sheik who feels above talking to a mere laborer is fooling only himself.

Take this little sermon to heart and treat every man as your equal; it will help you get ahead. How truly the Bible says, "The greatest among you shall be the servant of all."

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Eugene Zim ZimmermanEugene Zim Zimmerman

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit devoted to Eugene “Zim” Zimmerman.

TheoryTheory

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit entitled Theory.

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Exhibit: Zim’s Cartoons and Caricatures

The Zim Book on Cartooning

Eugene "Zim" Zimmerman was born in 1862 in Switzerland, and his family emigrated to the United States when he was seven. As a poor immigrant, Zim witnessed the “melting pot” of American culture first hand. His depictions of ethnic minorities were pointed, but honest and well observed. Although he is pretty much forgotten today, he was very well known in his time, and his humor captured the essence of turn-of-the-century America.

The Zim Book on Cartooning

Zim was the founder of the so-called "Grotesque" school of caricature, and was the first caricaturist to incorporate exaggerated cartooniness not only in the faces of his subjects, but in the bodies as well. Zim worked for Puck and Judge, the two top humor magazines of their day. Along with caricatures by George McManus and Frederick Burr Opper, Zim’s caricature of a moon faced grinning kid (an example of which appears on page 3 of this book) was said to be one of the earliest inspirations for Mad magazine’s mascot character, Alfred E. Neuman.

The Zim Book on Cartooning

Zim was a prolific artist, with more than 40,000 illustrations published in his lifetime. He retired from Judge in 1897 and founded the American Association of Cartoonists and Caricaturists. He was also a writer and teacher. His columns ran in Cartoons magazine during the early years of the century, as did ads for his correspondence course in cartooning.

The Zim Book on Cartooning

Animation Resources supporter Marc Schirmeister has been searching high and low for a copy of Zim’s early educational materials with no luck. But recently this 1910 book, packed with tips for the aspiring cartoonist, turned up in a used bookstore in Arizona…

Order The Zim Book on Cartooning

It’s worth noting that the price tag on the cover is an important clue to the value of these lessons to contemporary artists. According to the Consumer Price Index, $5 in 1910 is equivalent to $116 today. Five dollars represented a full day’s labor to many of the cartoonists who bought this book. Zim’s name in gold letters on the cover was the selling point that made so many aspiring cartoonists part with the “five plunks (in real Money)” as Zim so colorfully puts it in his introduction.

Order The Zim Book on Cartooning

These 100 pages are packed with great cartoons, helpful drawing tips, technical information and business advice for the aspiring cartoonist. Most importantly, Zim passes along his unique philosophy of life, and offers a shining example of how an artistic career as a caricaturist can be incorporated into a person’s lifestyle. At the time this book was written, Zim had thirty years of experience under his belt, and had attained the highest level in his field.

Here are just a few choice snippets from this great book…

The Zim Book on Cartooning
The Zim Book on Cartooning
The Zim Book on Cartooning
The Zim Book on Cartooning
Guess who?

If you are a fan of caricature, check out Will Finn’s latest post and the blog of my favorite caricaturist, Marlo Meekins.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Eugene Zim ZimmermanEugene Zim Zimmerman

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit devoted to Eugene “Zim” Zimmerman.

Friday, September 16th, 2011

Meta: Contribute to Animation Resources

AnimationResources.org is a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural arts institution, archive and library. It depends on donations from the public to fund its programs. We welcome contributions large and small using our PayPal links. Project sponsorship is available in the following levels.

PROJECT HEROES

Donations by individuals of $50 or more qualify for recognition in the sidebar of the site as “Project Heroes”.

PROJECT MEMBERS

Donations by individuals of $100 or more qualify for recognition in the sidebar of the site as “Project Heroes” and have access to special “members only” content and events.

PROJECT ANGELS

Individuals donating $500 or more are recognized in the sidebar of the site and by a thank you posting as “Project Angels”

All funds collected will be used to further the Animation Resources project. Your donations may be tax deductible. See your accountant for details.

PayPalAnimation
Please Help Animation Resources Help Artists Around the World!
Animation
Animation Resources depends on your contributions to support its services to the worldwide animation community. Please contribute using PayPal.