Archive for the ‘comic strips’ Category

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

Comic Strips: Chic Young’s Blondie

Chic Young Blondie

Chic Young was one of the most successful newspaper cartoonists of his time. His first syndicated strip, Dumb Dora ran from 1924 to 1930. He retired the strip to create a "pretty girl" comic (ala Polly & her Pals) titled Blondie. It was an instant hit. Young penned Blondie until his death in 1973. The strip is still in print, under the byline of his son, Dean.

Chic Young's Blondie

The other day, Animation Resources supporter Joe Campana stopped by for a visit. He brought along a book for us to digitize… Comics And Their Creators was written by Martin Sheridan in 1942. It’s a treasure trove of biographical information on great comic strip artists. Today, I am presenting the chapter on Chic Young, along with some rare original Sunday pages from the collection of Marc Crisafulli.

Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie

Here are some of the very earliest Blondie Sunday pages…

Chic Young's Blondie
July 19th, 1931

Chic Young's Blondie
August 9th, 1931

Chic Young's Blondie
August 16th, 1931

Chic Young's Blondie
August 23rd, 1931

Chic Young's Blondie
September 6th, 1931

Many thanks to Marc Crisafulli for sharing these rare original comics pages with us; and to Joe Campana of Animation Who And Where for lending us Comics And Their Creators.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Newspaper ComicsNewspaper Comics
This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Newspaper Comics.

Friday, October 14th, 2016

Comic Strips: George Lichty Grin And Bear It Orgy!

George Lichty Grin And Bear It

Animation Resources supporter Christopher Lopez saw our feature on George Lichty a month or two back and generously decided to donate a big stack of vintage Grin And Bear It dalies and Sunday pages. I grew up with George Lichty’s cartoons in the funnies every day, and as a kid, I didn’t give much thought to them. At first glance, Lichty’s drawings appear sloppy, with formulaic oafish characters standing around with their jaws agape. But look closer… His compositional sense and skill at putting across a visual gag is remarkable. There’s nothing sloppy about his use of perspective either. The most amazing thing is that his lines seem to be alive!

George Lichty Grin And Bear It

Along with the batch of comics, Christopher included an article on Lichty from 1952. It mentions a feature in the Saturday Evening Post titled "Does Lichty Really Hate People" (does anyone out there have a copy of that article we could scan?) and offers some choice tidbits on Lichty’s working habits and lifestyle…

George Lichty Grin And Bear ItGeorge Lichty Grin And Bear ItHe works best in a crowded, noisy newspaper office. His desk is heaped so high with old drawings, discarded captions, letters he has forgotten to mail, cigarette stubs and fan mail that ever fourth day the janitors are ordered to dig through the debris just to make sure that Lichty is still alive and breathing.

Lichty has a few happy passtimes… He likes to putter around the house. When in doubt he lays little brick walls that wind aimlessly around the Lichty garden. He also plays the bass drum, sometimes at home, but more often as a member of the Guckenheimer Sour Kraut Band, a unique musical institution that he says is perpetuating a dying art form. He is not certain what the art form is, but anyway, he admits it is dying.

Now if that isn’t a great description of the life of a cartoonist, I don’t know what is!

Lichty was one of the comic page’s longest working artists. His style changed little over the years. (Compare the examples below from the late thirties to the Sunday pages from the 50s.) Lichty’s distinctive free flowing lines were a staple of the funnies for over half a century. He may have drawn slouches, but I think you’ll agree, as an artist, he was no slouch himself!

George Lichty Grin And Bear It

Here (thanks to Joseph Campana) is the entry on Lichty from Martin Sheridan’s Comics And Their Creators…

George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It

1939 DAILY STRIPS

George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It

1937 SUNDAY PAGES

George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It

MID 1940s DAILY STRIPS

George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It

1950s SUNDAY PAGES

George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It

Thanks Christopher!

Check out the fascinating link between Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs and George Lichty in John K’s All Kinds of Stuff.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Newspaper ComicsNewspaper Comics
This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Newspaper Comics.

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

Exhibit: CAPPtivating Heroes: Jack Jawbreaker and Fearless Fosdick Fight Crime!

Al Capp Fearless Fosdick

Today, I’m proud to bring you another entry in Mike Fontanelli’s important series of articles on Al Capp’s life and career. It’s not good enough to bounce through a few pages of these stories and glance at the pictures. You have to sit down and READ them to get the full impact. If you don’t have time right now, bookmark this page and come back later. I’m sure you’ll find these stories as mind-blowing as I do! -Stephen Worth

Capp’s writing was first-rate, his characterizations were multitudinous and superb, his artwork was stunning, his compositions clever and arresting. For pure humor he was unequalled, and he blithely produced some of the most devastating satire and parody in our history. What elevates Capp even further… is his unfailingly prescient comments on human nature. –Richard Marschall, Nemo Magazine, April 1986

[Capp] was far more an intellectual than he allowed the public to see. ‘Li’l Abner’ was his joke on the dismal world around him. His humor welled- up from the melancholy pits of a strapping kid made an amputee at age nine- just when the other boys were learning to kick a football, and scruff along scattering leaves on autumn afternoons. –Milton Caniff, 1985

Li’l Abner was a comic strip with fire in its belly and a brain in its head. –John Updike, 1991

Al Capp Fearless Fosdick

Nearly all comic strips, even today, are owned and controlled by syndicates, not their cartoonist creators. But in 1947 Al Capp brazenly defied his own syndicate, United Features. He sued them for $14 million, publicly embarrassed them in Li’l Abner, and successfully wrested back ownership and artistic control of his creation.

Al Capp Fearless Fosdick

"Jack Jawbreaker Fights Crime!" (1947) may start out as an innocuous spoof of Superman, but don’t be fooled! It’s an angry and devastating satire of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster’s notorious exploitation by DC Comics…

Al Capp Lil Abner Jack Jawbreaker
Al Capp Lil Abner Jack Jawbreaker
Al Capp Lil Abner Jack Jawbreaker

Capp’s classic Dick Tracy parody, Fearless Fosdick, was in some ways his most significant creation- at least in terms of lasting influence. It was almost certainly Harvey Kurtzman’s major inspiration for creating his innovative, irreverent Mad magazine, which began as a comic book that specifically parodied other comics in 1952. That alone makes Fearless Fosdick, indirectly, one of the prime influences on postwar American popular culture.

Al Capp Fearless Fosdick

Similarities between Li’l Abner and the early Mad are unmistakable: the incongruous use of Yiddish terms, the nose-thumbing disdain for pop cultural icons, the persistent "black" humor, and most unmistakably, the extremely broad visual styling. Even the trademark comic "signs" that clutter the backdrops of Will Elder’s panels would seem to have precedence in Li’l Abner- in the residence of Dogpatch entrepreneur Available Jones. Tellingly, Kurtzman resisted parodying either Li’l Abner or Dick Tracy in the comic book Mad, despite their prominence.

Al Capp Fearless Fosdick

Sharp-eyed viewers of Warren Beatty’s big screen adaptation, Dick Tracy (1990) will have detected a direct, onscreen homage to Fearless Fosdick. The opera Tracy is attending when his 2-way wrist radio suddenly calls him to duty is titled "Die Schlmpf" on the concert program, after Elmer Schlmpf, the maniacal- albeit deceased- fiend from "The Poisoned Bean Case".

Like the Shmoo, Fosdick’s popularity would eventually rival that of the nominal star of the strip, Li’l Abner’s. So popular did Fosdick prove to be in his own right that he was licensed for use outside the strip, as a commercial pitchman for Wildroot Cream-Oil hair tonic. Fosdick’s image on tin signs and advertising displays became a prominent fixture in barbershops across America, as well as in animated TV commercials.

King Cole Trio

The Wildroot jingle- instantly familiar to radio listeners in the fifties- was performed by everyone from Bil Baird’s puppets to Nat King Cole, who once sang it on Woody Herman’s radio show. It went like this…

King Cole Trio: Wild Root Charlie
(AAC Audio File / 2 MB)

Get Wildroot Cream-Oil, Charlie!
It keeps your hair in trim
Y’see it’s non-alcoholic, Charlie,
It’s made with soothing lanolin!

You’d better get Wildroot Cream-Oil, Charlie!
Start using it today
You’ll find that you’ll have a tough time, Charlie
Keeping all those gals away!

Al Capp Fearless Fosdick

A long-running series of comic strip-format ads appeared in newspapers, magazines and comic books, usually featuring Fosdick battling his arch-villain nemesis, "Anyface". Anyface was a murderous, shape-changing scoundrel whose plastic features could be molded into any identity. He was always given away by his telltale dandruff and messy hair, however. The Wildroot print ads joined Li’l Abner’s national ad campaigns for Cream of Wheat cereal and Procter & Gamble detergents- and later, Hairless Joe and Lonesome Polecat’s supermarket pitches for Kickapoo Joy Juice- when Capp’s volatile moonshine concoctio
n was licensed as a soft drink in 1965.

Al Capp Fearless Fosdick

Here is an article from Pageant magazine from May of 1952 featuring a story on Fosdick’s father "Fearful Fosdick", and two of the more memorable run-ins with the mysterious Anyface…

Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick

In 1952, a puppet show based on Fearless Fosdick premiered on NBC on Sunday afternoons. Thirteen episodes were filmed featuring the Mary Chase marionettes. The TV show was presumed lost for decades, but vintage kinescopes have recently begun to resurface. According to publisher Denis Kitchen, there are currently efforts underway to release these exceedingly rare Fosdick episodes on a set of DVDs.

Our next story first appeared in 1948- before Monty Python, before Mad and Humbug, before Woody Allen’s classic stand-up routine about TV sets and elevators. Even years before Ernie Kovacs and "The Goon Show", Capp was already doing the kind of demented and surreal "sick" humor that would come into vogue just a few short years later.

Al Capp Fearless Fosdick

The classic story "The Case Of The Chippendale Chair" was certainly ahead of its time. It shows Al Capp in peak form and at fever pitch, hitting on all cylinders…

Al Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick
Al Capp Fearless FosdickAl Capp Fearless Fosdick

To be continued…

-Mike Fontanelli 2008

Be sure to let Mike know in the comments what you think of these articles. -Steve

Cartoonist Eddie Fitzgerald comments on this post at his blog, Uncle Eddie’s Theory Corner

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Al CappAl Capp

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit by Mike Fontanelli profiling the career of Al Capp.

Newspaper ComicsNewspaper Comics
This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Newspaper Comics.