Archive for the ‘comic strips’ Category

Monday, November 30th, 2020

Comic Strips: Chic Young’s Blondie

Chic Young Blondie

Chic Young was one of the most successful newspaper cartoonists of his time. His first syndicated strip, Dumb Dora ran from 1924 to 1930. He retired the strip to create a "pretty girl" comic (ala Polly & her Pals) titled Blondie. It was an instant hit. Young penned Blondie until his death in 1973. The strip is still in print, under the byline of his son, Dean.

Chic Young's Blondie

The other day, Animation Resources supporter Joe Campana stopped by for a visit. He brought along a book for us to digitize… Comics And Their Creators was written by Martin Sheridan in 1942. It’s a treasure trove of biographical information on great comic strip artists. Today, I am presenting the chapter on Chic Young, along with some rare original Sunday pages from the collection of Marc Crisafulli.

Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie
Chic Young's Blondie

Here are some of the very earliest Blondie Sunday pages…

Chic Young's Blondie
July 19th, 1931

Chic Young's Blondie
August 9th, 1931

Chic Young's Blondie
August 16th, 1931

Chic Young's Blondie
August 23rd, 1931

Chic Young's Blondie
September 6th, 1931

Many thanks to Marc Crisafulli for sharing these rare original comics pages with us; and to Joe Campana of Animation Who And Where for lending us Comics And Their Creators.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Newspaper ComicsNewspaper Comics
This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Newspaper Comics.

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Tuesday, November 24th, 2020

Magazine Cartoons: James Montgomery Flagg’s Nervy Nat

James Montgomery Flagg

James Montgomery FlaggJames Montgomery FlaggJames Montgomery Flagg is best known for his iconic recruitment posters like the one above, but he was also an accomplished magazine illustrator and cartoonist as well.

In 1890 at the age of 12, James presented himself and a group of sketches at the offices of St. Nicholas Magazine, the leading illustrated children’s publication of the time. He was shown to the office of one of the editors who looked at his drawings and determined that he showed promise. The editor praised the boy’s work and encouraged his parents to seek out art training for him. Flagg took classes at the Art Students’ League in New York, and within two years, he was a regular contributor to St. Nicholas, and Life magazine, and eventually landed a staff position at Judge. Alongside great artists like Grant Hamilton and Eugene Zimmerman, Flagg flourished, becoming one of the top illustrators of his day.

James Montgomery Flagg

Flagg was very versatile, and his sketches of beautiful women were just as well drawn as his caricatured cartoons. He was outspoken and critical of the art community. He once said that "the difference between the artist and the illustrator is that the latter knows how to draw, eats three square meals a day, and can pay for them."

From 1903 to 1907, Flagg drew a comic strip for Judge titled, "Nervy Nat". It appears to be based on the early vaudeville perfomances of W.C. Fields. Here are some examples of the strip from 1906 and 1907.

James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.

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Monday, November 16th, 2020

Comic Strips: George Lichty Grin And Bear It

George Lichty Grin And Bear It

Animation Resources supporter Christopher Lopez saw our feature on George Lichty a month or two back and generously decided to donate a big stack of vintage Grin And Bear It dalies and Sunday pages. I grew up with George Lichty’s cartoons in the funnies every day, and as a kid, I didn’t give much thought to them. At first glance, Lichty’s drawings appear sloppy, with formulaic oafish characters standing around with their jaws agape. But look closer… His compositional sense and skill at putting across a visual gag is remarkable. There’s nothing sloppy about his use of perspective either. The most amazing thing is that his lines seem to be alive!

George Lichty Grin And Bear It

Along with the batch of comics, Christopher included an article on Lichty from 1952. It mentions a feature in the Saturday Evening Post titled "Does Lichty Really Hate People" (does anyone out there have a copy of that article we could scan?) and offers some choice tidbits on Lichty’s working habits and lifestyle…

George Lichty Grin And Bear ItGeorge Lichty Grin And Bear ItHe works best in a crowded, noisy newspaper office. His desk is heaped so high with old drawings, discarded captions, letters he has forgotten to mail, cigarette stubs and fan mail that ever fourth day the janitors are ordered to dig through the debris just to make sure that Lichty is still alive and breathing.

Lichty has a few happy passtimes… He likes to putter around the house. When in doubt he lays little brick walls that wind aimlessly around the Lichty garden. He also plays the bass drum, sometimes at home, but more often as a member of the Guckenheimer Sour Kraut Band, a unique musical institution that he says is perpetuating a dying art form. He is not certain what the art form is, but anyway, he admits it is dying.

Now if that isn’t a great description of the life of a cartoonist, I don’t know what is!

Lichty was one of the comic page’s longest working artists. His style changed little over the years. (Compare the examples below from the late thirties to the Sunday pages from the 50s.) Lichty’s distinctive free flowing lines were a staple of the funnies for over half a century. He may have drawn slouches, but I think you’ll agree, as an artist, he was no slouch himself!

George Lichty Grin And Bear It

Here (thanks to Joseph Campana) is the entry on Lichty from Martin Sheridan’s Comics And Their Creators…

George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It

1939 DAILY STRIPS

George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It

1937 SUNDAY PAGES

George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It

MID 1940s DAILY STRIPS

George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It

1950s SUNDAY PAGES

George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It
George Lichty Grin And Bear It

Thanks Christopher!

Check out the fascinating link between Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs and George Lichty in John K’s All Kinds of Stuff.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Newspaper ComicsNewspaper Comics
This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Newspaper Comics.

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