Archive for the ‘magazine’ Category

Friday, January 10th, 2020

RefPack031: Mid Century Modern Cartooning From Behind The Iron Curtain

Reference Pack

REFPACK 031
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Every other month, members of Animation Resources are given access to an exclusive Members Only Reference Pack. These downloadable files are high resolution e-books on a variety of educational subjects and rare cartoons from the collection of Animation Resources in DVD quality. Our current Reference Pack has just been released. If you are a member, click through the link to access the MEMBERS ONLY DOWNLOAD PAGE. If you aren’t a member yet, please JOIN ANIMATION RESOURCES. It’s well worth it.


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PDF E-BOOK:
Eulenspiegel

Eulenspiegel Volume One
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July 1st to November 2nd, 1963

After the Second World War, satirical caricature magazines experienced a rapid decline. The general public in the post-war years wasn’t as receptive to radical politics and muckraking as they were before the war. One by one, satirical magazines around the world were replaced by illustrated current events magazines like Life, Look, The Illustrated London News and L’Illustration (see our previous e-book on the L’Illustration Christmas annuals for information on the rise of photo magazines.) Political cartooning migrated to the editorial page in the newspaper, and humor cartooning in magazines focused on social subjects in single panel gag cartoons. Harvey Kurtzman created Mad as a comic book, but soon the comic shifted to the satirical magazine format. Instead of lampooning political figures and Kings like the satirical magazines of the past, Mad Magazine made fun of TV stars and suburban lifestyles.

However, behind the Iron Curtain, satirical magazines didn’t disappear after World War II, in fact, they flourished for a time. Chief among these magazines was Krokodil. It was launched a few years after the Russian Revolution. Political satire in the Soviet Union was a dangerous thing, but Krokodil was given a wide berth to lampoon the inefficiency and lack of initiative of mid level bureaucrats and the sloppiness of labor workers.

Die Muskete Frischer Wind (Fresh Breeze) was one of the last satirical caricature magazines to be established, beginning in 1946. It was the only humor magazine in East Germany, and it was retitled after the legendary prankster Eulenspiegel in 1954. Only three East German magazines survived after the Berlin Wall fell, and Eulenspiegel was one of them. It continues to be published to this day. Punch ceased publication in 1991 after more than a century and a half in print, Krokodil closed its doors in 2008, Mad Magazine recently announced that they were ending their print magazine. It may well be that Eulenspiegel is the last of the classic satirical humor magazines still in circulation.

We know very little about the artists who drew for Eulenspiegel. If you have any information on them, please let us know so we can add it to our database. Animation Resources was fortunate to Find a batch of these rarely seen magazines in a bookshop in Hungary and had
them shipped to us in the United States for digitization. We hope you find them useful.

REFPACK031: Eulsenspiegel Volume One
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Adobe PDF File / 142 Pages / 734 MB Download


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EulenspiegelEulenspiegelEulenspiegelEulenspiegel
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Tuesday, January 7th, 2020

Inbetweens: The Genius of Don Martin

Don Martin Comic

Like Basil Wolverton and Virgil Partch, Don Martin is an artist that defies categorization. Known as “Mad’s Maddest Artist”, Martin was a mainstay at the magazine from 1956 until he left after a dispute over royalties for paperback reprints in 1987. Martin’s warped and slightly sick sense of humor was a perfect fit for Mad, and the magazine suffered after he left to join the staff of the competitor, Cracked. I think you’ll really enjoy Martin’s cartoons, but look beyond the gags to the posing, staging and hilarious drawings themselves. Martin was no slouch!

Don Martin Comic
Don Martin Comic
Don Martin Comic
Don Martin Comic
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Don Martin Comic
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GET THIS WHILE YOU STILL CAN!
Don Martin Book

A few years back, Running Press released MAD’s Greatest Artists: The Completely MAD Don Martin. It’s out of print now, but you can still find copies at some online retailers. It’s one of the best collections on a single Mad artist out there- big, beautifully printed and bound, a joy all around. It’s bound to be a collector’s item. Grab it while you still can.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

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Friday, December 20th, 2019

Magazine Cartoons: Reginald Birch and St Nicholas Magazine

St Nicholas Magazine Reginald Birch

A MAGAZINE FOR CHILDREN

In 1872, Scribner’s began publishing St Nicholas Magazine, a sister publication to The Century aimed at an audience between the ages of 5 and 18. As Linda Young points out in her excellent article on St Nicholas, in the late 19th and early 20th century, there was no real distinction between young children and teenagers. Children were considered children until they married or went away to college. Features "For The Little Folk" ran in St Nicholas side by side with articles on natural history or science intended for older readers. When it came to fiction, the subjects ranged from adventure stories about far-away lands to fairy tales and historical romance. St Nicholas was the premiere magazine of its type, and although it was aimed at children, it counted many adults among its readership.

St Nicholas Magazine Reginald Birch

But the main reason why we’re interested in St Nicholas is the illustrations. Scribner’s had access to many of the best artists of the day… Arthur Rackham, Harrison Cady, Maxfield Parrish, Willy Pogany, Charles Dana Gibson, Palmer Cox and Howard Pyle, among many others. But no artist was as closely associated with the look of St Nicholas as Reginald Birch.

St Nicholas Magazine Reginald BirchSt Nicholas Magazine Reginald BirchReginald Birch was born in 1856 in London, England. At the age of 14, he relocated to San Francisco, CA where he prepared wood block theater posters in his father’s shop. In 1873, Birch attended the Royal Academy in Munich and upon his return to America, he settled in as an illustrator in New York City.

Today, Birch may be forgotten, but his contribution to our American cultural identity certainly isn’t. At St Nicholas Magazine Birch took the character of Santa Claus, created by Thomas Nast in the 1862 Christmas Issue of Harper’s Weekly, and refined it into the jolly bearded character in the red suit that we all think of today.

St Nicholas Magazine Reginald Birch

1906 Christmas cover by Reginald Birch

Little Lord Fauntleroy Reginald BirchSt Nicholas Magazine Reginald BirchReginald Birch illustrated a wide variety of poems and stories for St Nicholas, but perhaps the most famous was Frances Hodgson Burnett’s "Little Lord Fauntleroy". Following Burnett’s vivid description, Birch created the iconic image of the precocious little boy in curls wearing a black velvet suit with lace collar. This image became the basis for the character Buster Brown, and was widely lampooned in parodies casting Burnett’s wunderkind as a spoiled brat or monster child, like Eddie Munster. The image of the enfant terrible in the Buster Brown outfit has entered our cultural subconscious to the point where most of us don’t even realize where it came from… but it came from Reginald Birch.

Little Lord Fauntleroy

Freddie Bartholomew as Little Lord Fauntleroy

By the beginning of World War I, Birch’s Victorian pen and ink style was beginning to look dated. Demand for his services began to decline, and by 1930, he was penniless. He enjoyed an "Indian Summer" as a book illustrator in the late 30s until his failing eyesight forced him to retire in 1941. He passed away in 1943.

Here is a fantastic story written by St Nicholas editor, Tudor Jenks and illustrated in the distinctive style by Reginald Birch. Notice how Birch juggles the text in the layouts, his superb draughtsmanship and control of perspective, and the expressive posing of his characters.

St Nicholas Magazine Reginald Birch
St Nicholas Magazine Reginald BirchSt Nicholas Magazine Reginald Birch
St Nicholas Magazine Reginald BirchSt Nicholas Magazine Reginald Birch
St Nicholas Magazine Reginald BirchSt Nicholas Magazine Reginald Birch
St Nicholas Magazine Reginald BirchSt Nicholas Magazine Reginald Birch
St Nicholas Magazine Reginald BirchSt Nicholas Magazine Reginald Birch
St Nicholas Magazine Reginald BirchSt Nicholas Magazine Reginald Birch
St Nicholas Magazine Reginald BirchSt Nicholas Magazine Reginald Birch
St Nicholas Magazine Reginald BirchSt Nicholas Magazine Reginald Birch
St Nicholas Magazine Reginald BirchSt Nicholas Magazine Reginald Birch
St Nicholas Magazine Reginald BirchSt Nicholas Magazine Reginald Birch
St Nicholas Magazine Reginald BirchSt Nicholas Magazine Reginald Birch

A SELECTION OF IMAGES FROM
THE CHRISTMAS, 1910 ISSUE

To finish out this post, here is a sampling of the sort of illustration and cartooning that filled the pages of a typical issue of St. Nicholas Magazine.

St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910
St Nicholas Magazine December 1910

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.
IllustrationIllustration

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit spotlighting Illustration.

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