Archive for the ‘fleischer’ Category

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

Inbetweens: Fleischer Studios Scrapbook

Here’s a gallery of interesting publicity images from Fleischer’s Out of the Inkwell Screen Songs, Betty Boop, Popeye and Superman series, as well as Gulliver’s Travels and Mr Bug Goes to Town.

Fleicher Studios Scrapbook

Fleicher Studios Scrapbook

Fleicher Studios Scrapbook

Fleicher Studios Scrapbook

Fleicher Studios Scrapbook

Fleicher Studios Scrapbook

Fleicher Studios Scrapbook

Fleicher Studios Scrapbook

Fleicher Studios Scrapbook

Fleicher Studios Scrapbook

Fleicher Studios Scrapbook

Fleicher Studios Scrapbook

Fleicher Studios Scrapbook

Fleicher Studios Scrapbook

Wednesday, September 24th, 2014

Illustration: Artzybasheff’s Machinalia

Artzybasheff Machinalia

In his introduction to the section titled "Machinalia" in his book As I See, Boris Artzybasheff says, "I am thrilled by machinery’s force, precision and willingness to work at any task, no matter how arduous or monotonous it may be. I would rather watch a thousand ton dredge dig a canal than see it done by a thousand spent slaves lashed into submission. I like machines."

Artzybasheff Machinalia

Making of Steel: Charging the Open Hearth

Artzybasheff Machinalia

Tapping a Heat of Steel

Artzybasheff Machinalia

Filling Ingot Molds

Artzybasheff Machinalia

The Soaking Pit

Artzybasheff Machinalia

The Blooming Pit

Artzybasheff Machinalia

The Rod Mill

Artzybasheff Machinalia

Hydraulic Press

Artzybasheff Machinalia

Stranding of Wire Rope

Artzybasheff Machinalia

Weaving of Fence Fabric

Artzybasheff Machinalia

Wire Drawing Machines

Artzybasheff Machinalia

Spring Forming Presses

Artzybasheff Machinalia

Wire Cloth Looms

Artzybasheff Machinalia

Navy’s Mark III Calculator

Artzybasheff Machinalia

Executive of the Future

Recently, I was asked by a visitor to the Archive what relevance half century old cartoons and magazine illustrations have to the current animation scene. Well, this question is best answered with an example… Look at these amazing designs by Boris Artzybasheff originally published in the 1950s, and look at this clip from Fleischer’s Lost & Foundry.. It doesn’t take a great deal of imagination to be able to picture what a sequence in a current CGI film would look like if it had designs like Artzybasheff’s and animation like the Fleischers’.


Lost and Foundry (Fleischer/1937) at YouTube

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

IllustrationIllustration

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit spotlighting Illustration.

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

Exhibit: Berny Wolf 1911-2006

Berny Wolf at Iwerks

Berny Wolf holds up a model sheet he created
along with Grim Natwick for an Iwerks Willie Whopper
cartoon. (See Al Eugster’s Photo Album)

(Originally posted 9/13/06) We received the sad news today that veteran animator, Berny Wolf passed away a few days ago at the age of 95. Berny was a real gentleman, and his career spanned the entire history of animation… from Fleischer, where he rotoscoped Cab Calloway as a ghostly walrus for "Minnie the Moocher"; to Iwerks, where he designed characters and animated on Willie Whopper and Comicolor cartoons; to Disney, where he animated on Pinocchio, Fantasia and Dumbo. In the TV era, Berny was a mainstay at Hanna Barbera and FilmRoman, continuing to work into his 80s.

Here are some model sheets Berny created along with Grim Natwick at Iwerks…

Berny Wolf Model Sheet
Berny Wolf Model Sheet
Berny Wolf Model Sheet
Berny Wolf Model Sheet

In this thread at Animation Nation, Ben Burgess mentioned that Berny animated the scene of Jimminy Cricket on the seahorse in Pinocchio. I have a drawing from that scene in my own collection and didn’t even realize that it was from one of Berny’s scenes…

Berny Wolf Jimminy Cricket

Perhaps Berny’s most famous scene is one he animated when he was just 21 years old… the ghostly walrus from the Fleischer Betty Boop cartoon, "Minnie the Moocher". Dave Fleischer assigned Berny to rotoscope footage of Cab Calloway. He told me that he did the work at Max Fleischer’s original rotoscope rig- the one on which they had rotoscoped Ko-Ko the Clown many years earlier. The rotoscope machine was made from an old camera stand, and it stood in a dark, dusty corner of the camera room. For a week, Berny sat alone in the corner, perched on a high stool rotoscoping Cab Calloway. Here is the film…

Minnie the Moocher

Minnie the Moocher (Fleischer/1932)
(Quicktime 7 / 17 megs)

Berny was a quiet, unassuming man. Perhaps that is why many people today are unaware of his importance to the history of animation. He was the quintessential East coast animator until the end, often attending important meetings in an impeccable pinstripe three piece suit, complete with a watch chain and white carnation in the lapel. ASIFA-Hollywood offers its condolences to the family of Berny Wolf. He will be missed by all who had the honor to know him.

COMMENTS

On behalf of my father, I want to say a heartfelt thank you for being so interested in his work and his life. You cannot imagine what it has meant for our family to see his name in print with all the wonderful comments. I can forward photos of him in the past and at his 94th birthday if you like. He was very shy and did not like having photos taken.

Sincerely,
Lauren Wolf-Purcell

Please do send the photos. We’re building a digital archive of information on the lives of great animators. If you have anything you would allow us to digitize to represent your father in our collection, please let us know. -Stephen Worth, Director

Read Mark Kausler’s overview of Berny’s career at Cartoon Brew
Mark Evanier’s remembrances.
Ernesto Pfluger’s Spanish obit

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

TheoryGrim Natwick

This posting is part of an online exhibit entitled Grim Natwick’s Scrapbook.
Animated CartoonsAnimated Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Animation.