Archive for the ‘pinups’ Category

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

Pinups: George Petty’s Ridgid Tools Calendars

Petty Girls

Petty GirlsPetty GirlsGeorge Petty was one of the top "cheesecake" illustrators of the 30s and 40s. He began his career with a series of cartoons featuring beautiful girls and their far from handsome beaus. His work coined the term "Petty Girls" to describe the carefully airbrushed girls with brilliant smiles and sexy poses. He left Esquire, to be replaced by Alberto Vargas who we will be featuring here soon, and became a freelance commercial artist. His girls soon ended up gracing magazine ads and calendars for such unlikely products as Tung-Sol Radio Tubes and the aptly named, Ridgid Tools.

Mike Fontanelli has generously allowed Animtion Resources to digitize his Rigid Tools. These calendar pages are among the most sought after pinup collectibles, selling for as much as $40 to $50 a sheet. Many thanks to Mike for sharing this with us.

Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls

Here’s an extra bonus! The 1947 Esquire Petty Girl calendar…

Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Pinups: Alberto Vargas

Alberto Vargas

Alberto VargasAlberto VargasWe’re very grateful to archive supporter, Chad Coyle for allowing us to digitize his collection of cartoons and illustrations from 1960s Playboy magazines. You might remember our previous posts on Erich Sokol, Eldon Dedini, Doug Sneyd and Phil Interlandi. Today, we focus on the "Grand Old Man" of pinup art, Alberto Vargas.

Vargas was born in Peru in 1896, and travelled to Europe with his family in 1911. His father was a photographer, and Vargas was exposed at an early age to the airbrush as a retouching tool. He studied to be a photographer, and worked in New York as a retoucher for a time, but Florenz Ziegfeld hired him as an illustrator for his Follies in 1917. He scraped by through the depression illustrating for various publications and movie studios. When George Petty left Esquire in 1940, Vargas took over his position with the magazine. Even though this brought much-needed exposure for Vargas’ work, the contract with Esquire was extremely unfair. The magazine even trademarked the name Vargas had been working under… "Varga" and wouldn’t allow him to use it for any other work. Vargas sued and broke the contract in 1950.

Alberto VargasAlberto VargasVargas added the "s" to his name and proceeded to rebuild his career, illustrating playing cards and taking freelance work for True magazine. In 1960, he was hired as an illustrator for Playboy, the venue that made him famous. The "Vargas Girl" represented a high level of perfection in beauty, erotic- but never vulgar. Even when Playboy would have allowed him to depict full frontal nudity, Vargas always kept his models discretely draped. He worked for Playboy until his 90th birthday in 1976, when he retired. Vargas passed away in 1982 at the age of 96.

Completing this group of postings on the Playboy artists of the 1960s, here is the work of the great Alberto Vargas…

VARGA IN THE 1920s

Alberto Vargas
Alberto Vargas
Alberto Vargas
Alberto Vargas
Alberto Vargas
Alberto Vargas
Alberto Vargas

VARGAS IN THE 1960s

Alberto Vargas
Alberto Vargas
Alberto Vargas
Alberto Vargas
Alberto Vargas
Alberto Vargas

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.

Friday, June 20th, 2014

Pinups: Eldon Dedini’s Satyrs and Nymphs

Eldon Dedini

You can’t beat Christmas in the country.

Eldon Dedini started out as a staff cartoonist at Esquire in 1942, before coming to Hollywood to work in animation. He was a storyboard artist at Universal for a few years in the mid-1940s, and joined Disney as a story artist on "Mickey & the Beanstalk", "Ichabod and Mr Toad" and several Donald Duck shorts. He continued to do cartoons for Esquire during this period, and moved to the New Yorker in 1950. He began contributing cartoons to Playboy in 1960, joining Phil Interlandi, Jack Cole, Doug Sneyd and Erich Sokol. Dedini passed away at his home in Carmel, CA in December of 2007.

Animation Resources supporter, Ken Kearney lives close to the Monterey area, where Dedini lived and worked for many years. In 2005, he produced an interview video, which he generously donated to archive database. Here is a clip from Ken’s video where Dedini tells how he got started as a cartoonist and his experiences as a story man with Disney on Fun & Fancy Free and Donald Duck cartoons like Dumbell of the Yukon.

Eldon Dedini Interview

Eldon Dedini Interview (Ken Kearney/2005)
(Quicktime 7 / 14.2 megs)

View the whole interview in five parts at YouTube

DEDINI IN PLAYBOY

Here is a feature on Dedini’s famous "Satyr & Nymph" comics from Playboy, followed by some higher resolution images of individual cartoons…

Eldon Dedini
Eldon Dedini
Eldon Dedini
Eldon Dedini

Eldon Dedini

We forgot the picnic basket!

Eldon Dedini

I’d like you to meet my father, but I don’t dare.
You know how even old satyrs are!

Eldon Dedini

It’s not that I didn’t believe in Santa Claus-
It’s just that you’ve shattered my image somehow…

Eldon Dedini Playboy Cartoon

Eldon Dedini Playboy Cartoon

Eldon Dedini Playboy Cartoon

Eldon Dedini Playboy Cartoon

Eldon Dedini

Shouldn’t we be putting nuts away for the winter or something?

Eldon Dedini

I hope nothing has happened to those two satyrs
who always surprise us at our bath.

Eldon Dedini

It’s become traditional. During the holidays
the country cousin visits the city cousin.

Eldon Dedini

Look at it this way- your medium is your message!

More great Dedini!

Eldon Dedini
You know, I think I’m actually learning
quite a lot at my Mother’s Knee, Mom.

Eldon Dedini
Well, I’ve always looked at it as sort of
stockpiling the American Dream!

Eldon Dedini
Well, I guess it just goes to prove that
not all God’s children got rhythm.

Eldon Dedini
Be sure to notice her dress. It’s a topless.

Eldon Dedini
Hi!

Eldon Dedini
Carl is always so interested in people

Eldon Dedini
Terrific, eh? Each year we rent the old lady and come
out here and have a real underground Christmas.

Eldon Dedini
Wow! This is the most consciousness-expanding
plum pudding I’ve ever eaten!

Eldon Dedini
Don’t you find that some New Years
are harder to bring in than others?

Eldon Dedini
Young man, you should be asleep!

If you’re a fan of Dedini, you will want to get Fantagraphic’s great book, An Orgy Of Eldon Dedini. It comes with a DVD documentary called "Dedini: A Life In Cartoons" Check it out!

I’m not sure if Ken is offering these for sale, but if you would like to inquire about ordering a DVD of Ken Kearney’s Dedini interview, email, kenkearneystudios@hotmail.com.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.