Archive for the ‘playboy’ Category

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014

Pinups: Phil Interlandi’s Playboy Cartoons

Phil Interlandi Playboy Cartoonist

The internet never ceases to amaze me… I was working on this post, featuring early examples of Playboy cartoons by Phil Interlandi, when I took a break to check my email… A message had just come in from Interlandi’s daughter Carla, filled with great info for our artist’s biography entry. I’m going to let her tell you about her father…

A BRIEF HISTORY OF PHIL INTERLANDI

By Carla Interlandi Armstrong

Phil Interlandi was a veteran freelance magazine cartoonist whose work appeared in national magazines ranging from Look to Better Homes & Gardens but most notably in Playboy, where he was a mainstay for decades. A longtime resident of Laguna Beach, CA, Interlandi sold his first cartoon to Playboy in 1955. "He had an acerbic wit." said Michelle Urry, Playboy’s cartoon editor. "He just ran roughshod over all the sacred cows. He didn’t care about the taboos."

Phil Interlandi Playboy Cartoonist
Phil Interlandi Playboy Cartoonist

The Chicago-born son of Sicilian immigrants, Interlandi showed artistic ability at an early age, as did his identical twin, Frank, who later became a syndicated political cartoonist for the Los Angeles Times. During World War II, Interlandi joined the Army at 17. He drew cartoons for The Yank, the Army newspaper, and was later a prisoner of war in Germany, a subject he didn’t like to talk about according to his daughter, Liza Stewart.

Phil Interlandi Playboy Cartoonist

After the war, Interlandi and his twin brother studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. Interlandi worked a number of years in advertising before becoming a full-time freelance magazine cartoonist. A year after he moved to Laguna Beach in 1952, his twin followed. The inseparable brothers were part of Laguna’s colorful cadre of cartoonists that grew to include Ed Nofziger, John Dempsey, Don Tobin, Roger Armstrong, Dick Shaw, Virgil Partch and Dick Oldden.

Phil Interlandi Playboy Cartoonist
Phil Interlandi Playboy Cartoonist

Following Phil Interlandi’s lead, the cartoonists began a midday ritual of taking a break from their drawing boards and meeting in the bar at the White House restaurant on Coast Highway. "That was the first bar I walked into in Laguna," Interlandi explained in 1982, "and it became a habit."

Phil Interlandi Playboy Cartoonist
Phil Interlandi Playboy Cartoonist

Interlandi illustrated a number of books, including Art Linkletter’s Kids Say the Darndest Things, and I Wish I’d Said That, in addition to Dick Van Dyke’s Faith, Hope and Hilarity: The Child’s Eye View of Religion and Ed McMahon’s The Barside Companion.

Phil Interlandi Playboy Cartoonist
Phil Interlandi Playboy Cartoonist

He was really just a marvelous artist," said New Yorker cartoonist Sam Gross, who had known Interlandi for 30 years. "He also really knew how to draw good looking girls and yet make the cartoon funny."

Phil Interlandi Playboy Cartoonist
Phil Interlandi Playboy Cartoonist

Phil Interlandi passed away in 2002 at the age of 78.

Phil Interlandi Playboy Cartoonist
Phil Interlandi Playboy Cartoonist
Phil Interlandi
We changed our minds!

Phil Interlandi
He’d rather fight than switch.

Phil Interlandi

Phil Interlandi

Phil Interlandi
You have a dirty mind. I like that in a man.

Phil Interlandi
Daphne! Get your butt in here!

Phil Interlandi
The starter is fresh!

Phil Interlandi
All I could get out of him was name, rank and serial number…
and an ingenious American invention called a "quickie".

Phil Interlandi
Pay attention, damn it, pay attention!

Thanks to Carla Interlandi Armstrong for the insights about her father’s life and career.

If you’re a fan of Playboy artists like Cole, Dedini, Wilson and Sokol, you will want to get this great collection of cartoons, Playboy: 50 Years- The Cartoons. Check it out!

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.

Friday, March 7th, 2014

Magazine Cartoons: Meet Doug Sneyd

Doug Sneyd Playboy Cartoons

Here’s a gift that I’ve taken much too long to acknowledge… Last Summer, Animation Resources supporter, Sean Worsham donated a great book of unpublished cartoons by Playboy cartoonist, Doug Sneyd. (Mr. Sneyd even autographed it for us!) It gives a fascinating glimpse at the thought process behind Sneyd’s wonderful cartoons. Here are a few choice pages from the book…

Doug Sneyd Playboy Cartoons
Doug Sneyd Playboy Cartoons
Doug Sneyd Playboy Cartoons
Doug Sneyd Playboy Cartoons
Doug Sneyd Playboy Cartoons

I highly recommend this book. You can order an autographed copy for yourself at… www.DougSneyd.com.

I’ve spent the better part of this week scanning more mid 60s Playboys. Here’s a gallery of Sneyd’s work from that period…

Doug Sneyd Playboy Cartoons
Doug Sneyd Playboy Cartoons
Doug Sneyd Playboy Cartoons
Doug Sneyd Playboy Cartoons
Doug Sneyd Playboy Cartoons
Doug Sneyd Playboy Cartoons
Doug Sneyd Playboy Cartoons
Doug Sneyd Playboy Cartoons
Doug Sneyd Playboy Cartoons

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.

Friday, July 19th, 2013

Magazine Cartoons: Kurtzman and Elder’s Little Annie Fanny

Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny

Today, we are featuring the work of two giants of cartooning… Harvey Kurtzman and Will Elder.

KurtzmanKurtzmanHarvey Kurtzman made a name for himself in his early years with the one page "Hey Look!" comics, as well as his work editing EC Comics’ war comics. His style was detailed and thorough. His layouts and continuity breakdowns left little room for deviation. When EC decided to create a humor line, Kurtzman was assigned the job as the founding editor of Mad. Beginning as a ten cent comic book, and eventually switching to a twenty five cent magazine (to avoid review by the Comics Code Authority), Mad became a huge hit in the five years it was under Kurtzman’s leadership. Much of the sensibilities of Kurtzman’s work for Mad are shared by "Little Annie Fanny" for Playboy.

Will ElderWill ElderWill Elder worked as an artist under Kurtzman at EC and on Mad, expanding and elaborating on Kurtzman’s detailed layouts. They were a great team, and the combination of Kurtzman’s foreground action and Elder’s background gags became a standard device for them throughout their collaborations. Other artists who worked on the "Little Annie Fanny" series were Jack Davis, Russ Heath and Al Jaffee (all former Mad alumni).

The "Little Annie Fanny" series debuted in the October 1962 issue of Playboy magazine. The comic was a parody of the Playboy image itself, vaguely based on the "Little Orphan Annie" theme, with lots of topical references and pokes at popular culture. The strip was the first fully painted comic in American magazines, and was very time consuming to produce. Kurtzman continued the series until 1988- its 100th episode- when he retired it, stating that all of the possible story ideas for the character had been exhausted.

January 1963

Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny

April 1964

Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny

March 1966

Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny
Kurtzman and Elder Little Annie Fanny

Little Annie FannyCheck out these great "Little Annie Fanny" collections at Amazon.com!

We’ll have more great Playboy cartoons for you soon.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.