Archive for the ‘caricature’ Category

Monday, October 14th, 2013

Exhibit: How To Draw Funny Pictures

Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures

Last week, I discussed Zim’s Cartoons and Caricatures. Here are some more examples of the genius of Eugene “Zim” Zimmerman from another vintage "how to" book… How To Draw Funny Pictures by E.C. Matthews. This chapter deals with a topic that is widely discussed today, racial stereotyping.

Ethnic humor was Zim’s stock-in-trade. He once joked that he and his fellow cartoonists at Puck magazine treated the various races and creeds that made up America with gloves… the kind boxers wear. Perhaps this is why he is virtually unknown today. But it’s unfair to sit like an armchair quarterback a century later judging an entirely different time by our own standards. Zim approached every person as a peer. He made fun of all of them equally.

Stereotypes are still part and parcel of caricature and cartooning. Pirates have eye patches and parrots on their shoulders. Surfer dudes wear baggy shorts and have long blonde hair. These are the generally understood symbols that represent specific types of people. How does a cartoonist utilize these common perceptions to communicate clearly while still remaining honest? Here is an important first-hand document of how Zim himself explained the purpose and limits of ethnic caricature in the "melting pot" of the early 20th Century.

Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures
Zim How To Draw Funny Pictures

Take note of this advice from the conclusion of this chapter…

Greatness makes one tolerant. Great men are not ashamed to stop on the street and talk to the man in overalls. They recognize the bond of friendship between the common people and themselves. The social sheik who feels above talking to a mere laborer is fooling only himself.

Take this little sermon to heart and treat every man as your equal; it will help you get ahead. How truly the Bible says, "The greatest among you shall be the servant of all."

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Eugene Zim ZimmermanEugene Zim Zimmerman

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit devoted to Eugene “Zim” Zimmerman.

TheoryTheory

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit entitled Theory.

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013

Caricature: George Grosz- The Hanging Judge of Art

George Grosz Caricatures

My Drawings expressed my despair, hate and disillusionment, I drew drunkards; puking men; men with clenched fists cursing at the moon. . . . I drew a man, face filled with fright, washing blood from his hands. . . I drew lonely little men fleeing madly through empty streets. I drew a cross-section of tenement house: through one window could be seen a man attacking his wife; through another, two people making love; from a third hung a suicide with body covered by swarming flies. I drew soldiers without noses; war cripples with crustacean-like steel arms; two medical soldiers putting a violent infantryman into a strait-jacket made of a horse blanket. . . I drew a skeleton dressed as a recruit being examined for military duty. I also wrote poetry. -Grosz

George Grosz Caricatures

During the first decades of the 20th Century in Europe, the dividing lines between commercial art and fine art did not exist. Easel painters would doodle caricatures in the street and submit political cartoons to satirical magazines like Le Rire in France and Jugend in Germany. All of these various genres of art fell under the domain of the “artist” and no genre was seen as superior to any other.

George Grosz Caricatures

One of the most gifted artists to come out of Weimar era Germany was George Grosz. Grosz drew cartoons and caricatures for “Simplicissimus”, as well as earning acclaim for his expressionist paintings. Caricature was part and parcel of his style, no matter what genre he worked in.

George Grosz Caricatures

In Grosz’s Germany, everything and everybody is for sale. All human transactions, except for the class solidarity of the workers, are poisoned. The world is owned by four breeds of pig: the capitalist, the officer, the priest and the hooker, whose other form is the sociable wife. He was one of the hanging judges of art. -Robert Hughes

George Grosz Caricatures

The war was a mirror; it reflected man’s every virtue and every vice, and if you looked closely, like an artist at his drawings, it showed up both with unusual clarity. -Grosz

George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures

DRAWINGS

George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures
George Grosz Caricatures

George Grosz BookGeorge Grosz Book



The best book on the work of George Grosz currently available is George Grosz: Berlin-New York. You can order it from Amazon. There are many, many fantastic drawings and paintings in this book.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Friday, July 26th, 2013

Editorial Cartoons: Arthur Szyk The New Order

Arthur Szyk was born in Poland and began painting at the age of four. He studied art in Paris until the outbreak of World War I, when he travelled East to study Mohammedan art. In 1914, he joined the Russian army, and later served as an officer in a guerrilla regiment in the Polish army. He married in 1921 and moved back to Paris, where he lived and painted until 1931. Szyk received many important commissions during this time… He illuminated the Covenant of the League of Nations, painted a series of miniatures dealing with the American Revolution that hangs in the White House, and spent three years working on an illumination of the Haggadah, the story of the Jews’ flight from Egypt which was dedicated to the King of England.

In 1940, Szyk relocated to Canada, eventually settling in New York City in 1941. Szyk’s political cartoons, which were published in the newspaper PM, were described by art critic, Thomas Craven as being “as compact as a bomb, extraordinarily lucid in statement, firm and incisive of line, and deadly in their characterizations.” The illustrations we scanned today are from a collection of Szyk’s political cartoons called “The New Order”..

Caricature is the foundation of cartooning. It involves the exaggeration of features to highlight and focus personality traits. Szyk was a master of caricature. His ability to clearly express the arrogance, irony and evil behind the trumped up facade of civilized behavior spoke louder than words. “The New Order” is a rare book. It was ahead of its time when it was published in 1941, before the United States entered the Second World War. Animation Resources was fortunate to locate a clean copy to digitize.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Editorial CartoonsEditorial Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Editorial Cartoons.
IllustrationIllustration

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit spotlighting Illustration.