Archive for the ‘course’ Category

Monday, October 22nd, 2012

Instruction: Preston Blair’s Advanced Animation

Preston Blair

An online drawing course
taught by Preston Blair & John Kricfalusi!
Click for details…

Preston BlairPreston BlairPreston Blair’s Animation (Book 1) is the best “how to” book on cartoon animation ever published. When Blair put the book together in 1947, he used the characters he had animated at Disney and MGM to illustrate the various basic principles of animation. Apparently, the rights to use some of the characters were revoked after the book was already in the stores. Publication was halted for a time, and he was forced to redraw most of the MGM characters, replacing them with generic characters of his own design. The revised edition went on to become a classic, and the first edition was forgotten.

If you are familiar with the revised edition, you’re in for a treat. Pull out your copy and compare it to these scans…

Preston Blair
Preston Blair
Preston Blair
Preston Blair
Preston Blair
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Preston Blair
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Preston Blair
Preston Blair
Preston Blair
Preston Blair
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Preston Blair
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Preston Blair
Preston Blair
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Preston Blair
Preston Blair
Preston Blair
Preston Blair
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Here are a couple of comments these postings have received…

"I began making animated films while I was a student at Santa Barbara Junior High School many, many years ago. The only text book I had was Preston Blair’s animation book. Honestly, it was all I needed to get started. I can’t remember how many copies of this book I’ve purchased over the years to give to young kids with an interest in animation. The book is pure gold." Floyd Norman

"A lot of young artists look at the Preston Blair book as some sort of archaic and old-fashioned irrelevant text. Almost as though learning these lessons will ruin their “style”. This of course is the folly of youth. The ability to draw like Preston Blair, using all the tips in the book gives you the strength to do ANYTHING." Nick Cross

"Many thanks on your posting of the original version of the Preston Blair animation book. If that’s not worth a contribution to your cause, nothing is. Keep up the good work." –Paul Dini

If you don’t have Preston Blair’s book yet,

ORDER IT NOW!

No cartoonist should be without it.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

INSTRUCTIONINSTRUCTION

This posting is part of an online series of articles dealing with Instruction.

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Exhibit: Zim’s Cartoons and Caricatures

The Zim Book on Cartooning

Eugene "Zim" Zimmerman was born in 1862 in Switzerland, and his family emigrated to the United States when he was seven. As a poor immigrant, Zim witnessed the “melting pot” of American culture first hand. His depictions of ethnic minorities were pointed, but honest and well observed. Although he is pretty much forgotten today, he was very well known in his time, and his humor captured the essence of turn-of-the-century America.

The Zim Book on Cartooning

Zim was the founder of the so-called "Grotesque" school of caricature, and was the first caricaturist to incorporate exaggerated cartooniness not only in the faces of his subjects, but in the bodies as well. Zim worked for Puck and Judge, the two top humor magazines of their day. Along with caricatures by George McManus and Frederick Burr Opper, Zim’s caricature of a moon faced grinning kid (an example of which appears on page 3 of this book) was said to be one of the earliest inspirations for Mad magazine’s mascot character, Alfred E. Neuman.

The Zim Book on Cartooning

Zim was a prolific artist, with more than 40,000 illustrations published in his lifetime. He retired from Judge in 1897 and founded the American Association of Cartoonists and Caricaturists. He was also a writer and teacher. His columns ran in Cartoons magazine during the early years of the century, as did ads for his correspondence course in cartooning.

The Zim Book on Cartooning

Animation Resources supporter Marc Schirmeister has been searching high and low for a copy of Zim’s early educational materials with no luck. But recently this 1910 book, packed with tips for the aspiring cartoonist, turned up in a used bookstore in Arizona…

Order The Zim Book on Cartooning

It’s worth noting that the price tag on the cover is an important clue to the value of these lessons to contemporary artists. According to the Consumer Price Index, $5 in 1910 is equivalent to $116 today. Five dollars represented a full day’s labor to many of the cartoonists who bought this book. Zim’s name in gold letters on the cover was the selling point that made so many aspiring cartoonists part with the “five plunks (in real Money)” as Zim so colorfully puts it in his introduction.

Order The Zim Book on Cartooning

These 100 pages are packed with great cartoons, helpful drawing tips, technical information and business advice for the aspiring cartoonist. Most importantly, Zim passes along his unique philosophy of life, and offers a shining example of how an artistic career as a caricaturist can be incorporated into a person’s lifestyle. At the time this book was written, Zim had thirty years of experience under his belt, and had attained the highest level in his field.

Here are just a few choice snippets from this great book…

The Zim Book on Cartooning
The Zim Book on Cartooning
The Zim Book on Cartooning
The Zim Book on Cartooning
Guess who?

If you are a fan of caricature, check out Will Finn’s latest post and the blog of my favorite caricaturist, Marlo Meekins.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Eugene Zim ZimmermanEugene Zim Zimmerman

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit devoted to Eugene “Zim” Zimmerman.

Friday, September 16th, 2011

Instruction: $100k Animation Drawing Course 10 – Models / Substance And Style

NOTE: Do not move on to this lesson unless you have completed Lesson Nine

LESSON TEN

Read John Kricfalusi’s introduction to this lesson at…

Animation School Lesson 10A: Model Sheets

Animation School Lesson 10B: Substance and Style

Print out and refer to these pages from the Preston Blair book, keeping in mind the following concepts…

CONTSTRUCTION

Preston Blair

LINE OF ACTION
Preston Blair

FLUID POSES
Preston Blair

CLEAR SILHOUETTES – NEGATIVE SHAPES
Preston Blair

APPEAL & CUTENESS
Preston Blair

And print out and draw from the model sheets on these pages that John uses as examples on his blog…

Reluctant Dragon Model Sheets
Reluctant Dragon Model Sheets

Model Sheets by Hurter and Thorson
Model Sheets by Hurter and Thorson

Mice and Duck Model Sheets
Mice and Duck Model Sheets

More Disney Model Sheets
More Disney Model Sheets

Terrytoons Model Sheets
Terrytoons Model Sheets

Iwerks Model Sheets
Berny Wolf’s Iwerks Model Sheets

When you are satisfied with your drawings, post them on your blog.

PLEASE NOTE: The procedure for getting your blog listed on this page has changed. Due to the overwhelming response to this course, I don’t have time to add each student’s link by hand. Your assignment will be automatically linked at the bottom of this page if you…

  • Click on “links to this post” at the bottom of this posting.
  • Click on “create a link”.
  • Copy and paste the HTML code into your completed assignment for lesson number 9.
  • Publish your post.

Your page will automatically be added to the list of links.

Do not delete or edit your posts or change the title after you have posted them. You will need them later to chart your progress.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

INSTRUCTIONINSTRUCTION

This posting is part of an online series of articles dealing with Instruction.