Archive for the ‘magazine’ Category

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

Magazine Cartoons: James Montgomery Flagg’s Nervy Nat

James Montgomery Flagg

James Montgomery FlaggJames Montgomery FlaggJames Montgomery Flagg is best known for his iconic recruitment posters like the one above, but he was also an accomplished magazine illustrator and cartoonist as well.

In 1890 at the age of 12, James presented himself and a group of sketches at the offices of St. Nicholas Magazine, the leading illustrated children’s publication of the time. He was shown to the office of one of the editors who looked at his drawings and determined that he showed promise. The editor praised the boy’s work and encouraged his parents to seek out art training for him. Flagg took classes at the Art Students’ League in New York, and within two years, he was a regular contributor to St. Nicholas, and Life magazine, and eventually landed a staff position at Judge. Alongside great artists like Grant Hamilton and Eugene Zimmerman, Flagg flourished, becoming one of the top illustrators of his day.

James Montgomery Flagg

Flagg was very versatile, and his sketches of beautiful women were just as well drawn as his caricatured cartoons. He was outspoken and critical of the art community. He once said that "the difference between the artist and the illustrator is that the latter knows how to draw, eats three square meals a day, and can pay for them."

From 1903 to 1907, Flagg drew a comic strip for Judge titled, "Nervy Nat". It appears to be based on the early vaudeville perfomances of W.C. Fields. Here are some examples of the strip from 1906 and 1907.

James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

Illustration: Milton Caniff and Norman Rockwell in Coronet

Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon

The Milton Caniff Estate recently loaned Animation Resources copies of two issues of Coronet magazine from 1942 and 1947 to digitize. Here are three articles of interest to cartoonists and illustrators…

Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon

AMERICA’S PIONEER JAP FIGHTER
By Howard Whitman

Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve CanyonMilton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon
Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon
Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon
Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve CanyonMilton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon
Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon
Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon

NORMAN ROCKWELL: The People’s Painter
By Jack H. Pollack

Norman Rockwell
Norman RockwellNorman Rockwell
Norman RockwellNorman Rockwell
Norman RockwellNorman Rockwell

CONFESSIONS OF A COMIC STRIP ARTIST
By Milton Caniff

Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon
Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve CanyonMilton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon
Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve CanyonMilton Caniff Terry and the Pirates Steve Canyon

Thanks to John Ellis and the estate of Milton Caniff for sharing this with us!

STEVE CANYON TV SHOW

Milton Caniff Steve Canyon
The Steve Canyon Special Edition DVD is out now! To order it and for more info on the Steve Canyon TV show, see… www.stevecanyondvd.blogspot.com

STEVE CANYON AT AMAZON

Milton Caniff BookOrder Steve CanyonOrder Steve CanyonFantagraphics has a great book on Caniff’s career, and Checker has released year by year reprints of the classic Steve Canyon strip. Caniff was a master storyteller, and the first few years of Steve Canyon are examples of his genius at the height of its powers. Click on the pictures for more info.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

IllustrationIllustration

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit spotlighting Illustration.
Newspaper ComicsNewspaper Comics
This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Newspaper Comics.

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

Magazine Cartoons: What’s Wrong With This Picture?

What's Wrong With This Picture

My mother passed away a little over a year ago, and recently I’ve been going through some boxes of things she left behind. I found a book of crafts, games and puzzles from 1927 that must have been given to her when she was very young. It included these “What’s Wrong With This Picture?” cartoons by Joe McIntosh. They appear to be created as one panel magazine cartoons.

I don’t know anything about the artist, but this style of cartooning was very popular in the 20s. Just about every college newspaper and humor magazine had cartoons that looked very similar. The leading proponent of the simplified round head style was John Held Jr. Early Puppetoons by George Pal also had a similar feel. Although Joe McIntosh’s cartoons aren’t nearly as sophisticated as those of Held or Pal, they’re still very clever and fun.

Whenever I see straightforward, appealing cartoons like this, I wonder… Why are CGI designs are so needlessly complex and realistic? And why are Flash characters so flat that it limits their ability to be posed? Here are cartoony, stylized designs that have volume and work well within the perspective of a three dimensional environment. These sorts of characters would be easy to animate expressively using just about any technique- hand drawn, CGI, puppet, clay or Flash. Naturally, the subject matter here is dated, but the basic proportions and shapes could easily be applied to a more modern context. I’d love to see contemporary cartoons that are this simple and fun again.

See how many mistakes you can spot!

WHAT’S WRONG WITH THIS PICTURE?

What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture
How many mistakes did you count?

What's Wrong With This Picture
What's Wrong With This Picture

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.