Archive for the ‘esquire’ Category

Thursday, July 7th, 2022

Annual Member Bonus Archive Update: Esquire, Starevich and Fleischer

Bonus Download

As a special thank you to our annual General and Student members, we have created a special page where we will archive past Reference Packs. There will be at least four reruns of complete RefPacks per year.

If you are currently on a quarterly membership plan, consider upgrading to an annual membership to get access to our bonus page with even more downloads. If you still have time on you quarterly membership when you upgrade to an annual membership, email us at…

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membership@animationresources.org

…and we will credit your membership with the additional time.


ANNUAL MEMBER BONUS ARCHIVE
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Available to Student and General Members


PDF E-BOOK:
Esquire

Esquire Magazine
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Cartoon Annual Volume 1 (1937)

Esquire was the leading "gentleman’s magazine" of its day. Great writers like F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemmingway wrote for the magazine, and the Esquire staff included a stable of illustrators and cartoonists that represented the best in the field. Even though it was founded in the height of the depression, the publishers spared no expense to produce a first class product. The cover price was fifty cents, many times the price of any other magazine on newsstands at the time. Hugh Hefner began his career as a copy editor at Esquire in the late forties, and it’s clear that his vision of what Playboy would become was greatly influenced by Esquire.

In 1937, the staff of Esquire prepared a prototype copy of a proposed cartoon annual containing the best cartoons from the first few years of the magazine’s publication. However before the book could be printed, the project was cancelled and the prototype was put on the shelf. Twenty years later, they finally did publish a book honoring the great work of the Esquire art staff, but it was a much different selection of cartoons. Animation Resources was given access to the one-of-a-kind prototype of the 1937 book, and we will be sharing it with our members in this, the first of two e-books. We hope you find it to be useful.

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Annual Member Bonus Archive
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Downloads expire after September 2022

DVD QUALITY VIDEO:
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The Mascot

The Mascot
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(Ladislas Starevich/1933)

Ladislas Starevich created the first puppet animation film in 1912 and continued to work in the medium for half a century. He was born in Russia to Polish parents in 1882 and emigrated to France soon after World War I. Assisted by his wife, who made the costumes for the puppets, as well as his daughter and son, Starevich produced a large and varied filmography. We are presenting the most famous of his films, "The Mascot", which Terry Gilliam has cited as one of the ten greatest animated films of all time.

"The Mascot" (1933) is a technical marvel, with sophisticated puppet armatures, a wide variety of techniques, and fantastic subject matter. Starevich simulated motion blur in this film by smearing vaseline on a glass plate between the camera and the puppet. He also broke new ground by rigging the puppets so they could move slightly while the shot was being exposed. This technique predated Jim Danforth’s "Go Motion" in the Star Wars films by almost 50 years! We have deinterlaced this film and encoded it at an increased bitrate so you can step frame through the animation and study the animation. Starewich often created a seamless blend of several different techniques in a single shot. It’s fascinating to look at the work frame by frame to discover the secrets behind the cinematic magic.

"The Mascot" was edited and reformatted several times over the years. It is rarely seen with the original soundtrack and running time, but Animation Resources obtained a copy of the film as it was first released and we are proud to be able to share that with you. If you would like to see more films by Starevich, let us know on the Animation Resources Facebook page.

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Annual Member Bonus Archive
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Downloads expire after September 2022

DVD QUALITY VIDEO:
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Screen Songs

Two Fleischer Screen Songs
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“Tune Up And Sing” (1934) “Let’s All Sing Like The Birdies Sing” (1934)

When the Hayes Office took aim at risqué humor in the movies, Fleischer’s Betty Boop cartoons were square in its crosshairs. The difference between the 1933 Betty Boop cartoons and the ones from 1934 is stark, and the series never really recovered from the blow. The Screen Songs weren’t hit nearly as hard, but you can still see that when it comes to gags, punches are being pulled. To add insult to injury, when these cartoons were syndicated to television in the late 1950s, the live action celebrity cameos and singalong sequences were usually cut out, and that is the case with the two examples we are sharing in this Reference Pack. But because of the way the cartoons were constructed, the edit isn’t too noticeable and they play well as short cartoons.

In the home video era, the Fleischer Screen Songs cartoons are missing in action. Only a tiny handful have been released. Animation Resources would like to thank our Advisory Board Member, Steve Stanchfield for sharing these rare films with us.

Click to access the…

Annual Member Bonus Archive
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Downloads expire after September 2022

Get your friends to join Animation Resources!
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More members mean we can bring you more special downloads.


Live Streaming Project

Animation Resources is asking our membership to consider donating to help us establish a video podcasting studio to be able to present seminars, interviews and informal updates live streamed on YouTube and Facebook. Our goal is for 25 of our members and supporters to donate $100. If you donate $100, we will provide you with a coupon code for a free membership to give as a gift to a friend or peer, or we can credit your donation to sponsor two students for a one year student membership.

By helping others, you help yourself.

25 x 100

Please consider donating using the PayPal Donate Button below. For more information on our Video Podcasting Fundraiser, see the article Animation Resources Needs Your Help.

PayPalAnimationAnimation Resources depends on your contributions to support its projects. Even if you can’t afford to donate $100 or join our group right now, please click the button below to donate whatever you can afford using PayPal. Every little bit helps.

Donate Today

Or you can donate on Facebook, here…
FACEBOOK LIVESTREAM FUNDRAISER

After you have donated, drop us an email at sworth@animationresources.org and let us know if you would like a discount code for a free membership, or if you would like us to sponsor students with your donation.

Raising the bar with our live streaming initiative will make things better for the whole art form. Don’t stay on the sidelines. Be a part of Animation Resources and join our team to build the foundation for the future of animation.

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Tuesday, June 28th, 2022

Pinups: Al Moore Girls From Esquire

Al Moore Calendar Girls from Esquire

Esquire magazine was one of the top publications of its time. It was to the first half of the 20th century what Playboy was to the last half. The pinups of George Petty and Alberto Varga made the magazine famous. Al Moore painted the Esquire girls and the annual calendar in the late 40s and early 50s. I’m sorry to say, I don’t know much about him. His fame has been eclipsed by his predecessors. But his wide eyed blondes have a lot of charm. Here are a couple of fold-outs from the pages of Esquire and the 1950 Esquire calendar…

Al Moore Calendar Girls from Esquire
Al Moore Calendar Girls from Esquire
Al Moore Calendar Girls from Esquire
Al Moore Calendar Girls from Esquire
Al Moore Calendar Girls from Esquire
Al Moore Calendar Girls from Esquire
Al Moore Calendar Girls from Esquire
Al Moore Calendar Girls from Esquire
Al Moore Calendar Girls from Esquire
Al Moore Calendar Girls from Esquire
Al Moore Calendar Girls from Esquire
Al Moore Calendar Girls from Esquire
Al Moore Calendar Girls from Esquire

And here as an added bonus is the 1946 Esquire Pocket Calendar by Alberto Varga (Before he got the "s" at the end of his name…)

Al Moore Calendar Girls from Esquire

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.

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Wednesday, June 9th, 2021

Pinups: George Petty’s Ridgid Tools Calendars

Petty Girls

Petty GirlsPetty GirlsGeorge Petty was one of the top "cheesecake" illustrators of the 30s and 40s. He began his career with a series of cartoons featuring beautiful girls and their far from handsome beaus. His work coined the term "Petty Girls" to describe the carefully airbrushed girls with brilliant smiles and sexy poses. He left Esquire, to be replaced by Alberto Vargas who we will be featuring here soon, and became a freelance commercial artist. His girls soon ended up gracing magazine ads and calendars for such unlikely products as Tung-Sol Radio Tubes and the aptly named, Ridgid Tools.

Mike Fontanelli has generously allowed Animtion Resources to digitize his Rigid Tools collection. These calendar pages are among the most sought after pinup collectibles, selling for as much as $40 to $50 a sheet. Many thanks to Mike for sharing this with us.

Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls

Here’s an extra bonus! The 1947 True Magazine Petty Girl calendar…

Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls
Petty Girls

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Magazine CartoonsMagazine Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Magazine Cartoons.

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