Archive for the ‘membership’ Category

Monday, September 25th, 2017

Background Layout Seminar: JOIN Animation Resources TODAY!

Animation Resources Student Membership Discount is still active. JOIN TODAY! https://animationresources.org/membership/levels/

When you join Animation Resources, you get a lot more than just what you see daily on Facebook. Every other month, members get access to a downloadable reference pack- a PDF e-book filled with rare artwork and DVD quality animated films. In addition, we produce seminars and lectures on video.

Here is an example of a video “show and tell” we recently shared with our member. It’s two solid hours of insight into the design process that goes into designing backgrounds for an animated television series.

In a couple of days, we will be making this video “members only” again, so watch it while you can… and JOIN Animation Resources so you won’t miss any of our future video seminars.

VIDEO SEMINAR 001:
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BG Layouts By Nestor Redondo

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Aired 07/21/17 / YouTube / 720p HD / 2:00:00


Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo

Animation Resources is proud to present a two hour video seminar on background layout featuring the work of Nestor Redondo. The video contains hundreds of incredible drawings illustrating every conceivable environment from Amazon rain forests to urban cityscapes to cartoon towns to outer space. Redondo was a brilliant artist and his work will show you how a professional background layout artist thinks.

Animation Resources Members, LOGIN to the Members Only Page to access the full two hour video seminar.
https://animationresources.org/membersonly/

If you aren’t a member yet, JOIN Animation Resources and access all of our Members Only content!
https://animationresources.org/membership/levels/

Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo

Nestor Redondo

BIOGRAPHY

Nestor Redondo was born in Canton, Locos Sur, Philippines on May 4, 1928. He began drawing at an early age influenced vt European old masters such as Michelangelo, DaVinci and Rembrandt, as well as American illustrators Dean Cornwell, Virgil Finlay, J. C. Leyendecker and Norman Rockwell. He was an admirer of the graphic story work of Caniff, Foster, Raymond, Fine and Kirby.

Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo

Nestor and his brother Virgillo were encouraged to pursue an artistic career by their father, who attended Ohio State University with Milton Caniff. He would proudly show Caniff’s strips to his two sons. Nestor drew day and night as a youngster. At night, the only illumination was a flickering candle. When his mother would call a halt by taking the candle away, Nestor would continue to draw by the light of the moon.

Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo

After high school, Redondo studied architecture. His elder brother Virgillo, already an artist and writer for comics, encouraged him to take up that trade. Virgillo was the writer and Nestor the artist on many of the Philippine comics industry’s all-time classics. Several of these efforts were made into movies by the Philippine movie industry. Nestor was also active creating posters and ads for these and other Phillipine movies.

Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo

Nestor Redondo’s comics were among the most popular in the Philippines from their first appearance in the late Forties. Among the major characters he created was “Ga Ga Mba” (“The Spider”) who was a superhero with the trappings of a spider, which preceded (and differed somewhat) from the U.S. version. Another was “Palos”, a James Bond style detective/adventure strip (written with Virgillo).

Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo

Redondo eventually became a comics publisher himself. Two of the weekly and bi-weekly books he published were “Cras Pubs” and “Ares Pubs” These were notable for two reasons, aside from Nestor’s beautiful art. One is that Nestor used these books to give experience to many of the students of the fine arts who would come to Redondo for training in basic drawing and storytelling techniques, which were unavailable in art school curriculums. The other was the free hand he gave to the legendary experimental and wildly imaginative Philippine artists: Renato Lemos, Joel Maggayo, Alex Nino, Roz Matienzo and Tony DeZuniga.

Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo

In the early 1970s, Nestor’s work came to the attention of DC Comics. They saw the potential his work contained and hired him. His first solo book for DC, “Rima” stands as a magnificently rendered comic. He took over art chores on the popular “Swamp Thing” comics, replacing Berni Wrightson. He also did a noteworthy treasury sized adaptation of the Bible for DC.

Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo

Nestor is also an accomplished oil and watercolor painter. He is one of the few fine artists working in the comics His paintings are purchased by art collectors in the Philippines and Japan, including Imelda Marcos, first lady of the Philippines. To this day, sculptors will often consult with Nestor regarding their basic drawings. American audiences got their first look at Redondo’s painting style in 1979 with two covers for Marvel Comics’ “Savage Sword of Conan”. It’s interesting to note that Nestor Redondo does not use models in his work. Nestor plans to keep busy in the coming years with a variety of projects, as well as continuing to develop new artists at his studio in Manilla. Already younger brother Francisco (“Quico”) has done illustrations for DC.

Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo

Nestor’s attitude toward his art can be summed up in this quoter from Philippine archivist Orly Jundis…

“He takes fine art away from the confines of the museum or the home of a private collector and draws specifically for the entertainment of the masses”

Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo

This biography of Redondo was written in 1979. He passed away in 1995.

Many thanks to Ken Leonard for sharing these treasures with us.

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Tuesday, September 12th, 2017

Animation Resources’ RefPack018 Available For Download Now!

Dore Grotesque Caricature

ANIMATION RESOURCES MEMBERS: Reference Pack 018 has just been posted on the Members Only page. This time we have a great batch of reference material for you…. A rare volume of “grotesque caricatures” by Gustave Dore from 1867, a 1944 Popeye cartoon transferred in HD from an original 35mm Technicolor print, and a pair of cartoons by the underrated comedian/film maker/cartoonist Charlie Bowers.

Proceed to the download page by following this link…
https://animationresources.org/membersonly/

Dore Grotesque Caricature

If you aren’t a member yet, please consider joining our organization. The cost is small compared to the treasures that members receive. This month Student Memberships are discounted. If you are studying to work in animation, you owe it to yourself to broaden your horizons with the resources we provide.

JOIN Animation Resources!
https://animationresources.org/membership/levels/

Dore Grotesque Caricature

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Monday, September 11th, 2017

Animation Students: Do you know about THE BIG LIE?

The Big Lie

ANIMATION STUDENTS: Do You Know About The Big Lie?

You’ve chosen a good school to go to. You’re doing well in your classes… Once you graduate, you’ll get a job and be started on your career in animation. Can you spot the huge error in these simple statements? If you’re an animation professional, I bet you can! If you’re an animation student and you don’t see it, read on…

The biggest misconception most animation students have is that school is preparing them for a job. Nothing could be further from the truth. You can go to the best animation school in the world and graduate with honors and still not have what it takes to walk into an animation studio, sit down at a desk and go to work. It just isn’t possible in a school situation to teach students everything it takes to be a functioning professional in four short years.

Many students think of college the same way they thought about grade school. You sit at your desk and you do the assignments and your work is graded. But there’s a big difference between grade school and college. In grade school, if you are an A student, you can get into a good college. In college, grades are meaningless. A potential employer doesn’t care what grades you got on your assignments. Odds are the employer doesn’t even care if you graduated from college. All the employer cares about is whether can you do the job in a timely manner with quality results.

If an employer doesn’t care if you went to school or not, what is the point of going to school?

Now we’re getting to the heart of this issue… What is school for? School isn’t a place that spoon feeds you training to get a job. It’s a FORUM FOR LEARNING. A good animation school can do two things… It can put you in an environment where you are surrounded by educators who know their subject, and you’re part of a large group of students who all have similar goals. This is a very supportive environment to learn in. Secondly, school can provide you with resources that may be more difficult to get access to in the “real world”. University libraries are packed with books on important subjects. Colleges host uninstructed life drawing sessions, screenings and film festivals and lectures by top professionals. These extra curricular activities may not be accessible to you after you graduate. You need to take advantage of them while you can.

The Big Lie

Schools provide a rich environment for learning. But it’s up to you to GET AN EDUCATION.

There just isn’t time in four years to go over everything you need to know. There are skills that need nurturing and developing, and there is a level of experience and awareness you need to gain to widen your frame of reference and get your creative juices flowing. Animation schools expect you to do these things on your own time. Instructors may encourage their classes to study and work on their own skills outside of class time, but many of the students are still stuck in grade school thinking- if it isn’t being graded, it doesn’t count. The truth is the work you do outside of classes is MORE important than what you do in class.

A tradesman may learn how to use his tools and then be ready to work on a job, but being an artist requires disiplined thinking and creativity forever. Your current level of skills and experience may get you that first job, but if you want to move up to greater responsibility, you’ll need to work on developing the skills that are required to advance. You might be comfortable creating in a specific style, but if you want a job, you have to draw in the style of the show, not your own style. Even if you do get a job on a show that happens to match your particular artistic sensibilities, times change and styles change. Five or ten years down the road, the look of animation will be different and employers will be looking for something current. You have to be able to reinvent yourself creatively if you want to survive. Ask anyone who has worked in animation a decade or more if they have had to reinvent themselves in their career. They’ll tell you.

OK, the bubble is burst. You now know about the Big Lie. You’re on your own to deal with it. Say you re going to animation school right now… It’s a lot better to be told all this BEFORE you graduate than to find it out the hard way afterwards.

What can you do in school to be as prepared as you can for a job in animation?

You need to LEARN TO LEARN- learn to set your own goals, determine a curriculum for yourself, buckle down and work to improve your skills, push the envelope of your creativity by exposing yourself to different ways of thinking about your art, learn to GROW. Look at what the college is offering you, talk to professionals and ask them what you should be learning, supplement your college work with SELF STUDY. Don’t just do what you want to do. Do what you NEED TO DO. It’s very hard and very time consuming to gather together the skills and frame of reference you need to be a professional. But it’s a lot easier to devote time to that while you’re in school. If you wait until you graduate, self study is going to have to compete with paying your bills and fulfilling your responsibilities as an adult. Your college years are a WINDOW OF OPPORTUNITY to learn to learn. Don’t waste it!

But that’s not all… Learning doesn’t end when you graduate from college. It’s a life-long responsibility for artists. Get in the habit now of pushing yourself to better yourself. It will be the most important lesson you learn from college.

The Big Lie

Where do you look for resources to help you in your SELF STUDY PROGRAM?

Every one will need to create their own curriculum to open their mind creatively and build their skill set. Every student is different. Every school is different. There are a million online courses and books to study from. But even those aren’t enough. The world of creativity is wider than you can possibly imagine. Animation Resources has gone to successful animation professionals like Ralph Bakshi, Will Finn and Sherm Cohen and has asked them what resources have been useful to them in their work. Every other month, Animation Resources publishes a downloadable reference pack filled with the material these advisors recommend. This Reference Pack will help you with your self study program and open your mind to possibilities you didn’t know existed.

But you have to be a member of Animation Resources.

During the month of September, Animation Resources is helping students studying animation, cartooning and illustration by lowering the dues for Student Membership. For $50 a year, students can receive full benefits of membership- the same benefits that professional members receive. $50 a year is less than $5 a month. Of course you can afford it. Don’t expect your parents to pay your dues. Do it for yourself. You’re spending a great deal of money on tuition, books and supplies and student loans to get your degree. But now you know about THE BIG LIE and that knowledge is worth a lot more than just $50. The truth is that your degree is only HALF of your education. Don’t cheap out on the half that matters- the half that will be continuing for the rest of your life.

JOIN ANIMATION RESOURCES TODAY… https://animationresources.org/membership/levels/,

You’ll thank us for it on the first day of your new job in the animation business.

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