Archive for the ‘membership’ Category

Wednesday, February 26th, 2020

Where Do My Animation Resources Dues Go?

Animation Resources is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Our group is operated entirely by volunteers, there are no employees. 100% of the money that we collect in dues and direct donations go to supporting our programs serving the worldwide animation community. For instance, here is one thing Animation Resources members have purchased for the organization…

Drobo 5n

This is a Drobo 5n network attached server. This holds five 10TB hard drives. With a usable disk space of 30TB. It spreads the data across all five drives, so if one hard drive fails, or even two hard drives crash at the same time, all we have to do is pop a new drive in, and the data is recreated from the redundant data on the remaining drives. Our volunteers have invested tens of thousands of hours into digitizing animated films and artwork for our archive database. A solid backup plan and equipment like this is vital to protecting that investment.

When we began accepting memberships four years ago, all we had was one copy of each digital file in our collection on hard drives that dated back as far as six years. Since then, we have been using the money from the membership dues to purchase new, more rugged drives and disk arrays like this Drobo. At this point between our master servers and all of our backups, we have nearly 200 TB of data. All of our data is fully protected now, but we are working on creating a third backup for offsite storage.

Drobo 5n

This Drobo 5n has the potential to allow us to connect our database to the internet, so volunteers who don’t happen to live in the Los Angeles area can log in remotely to help us catalog and cross link our collection. In the past year or two, we have purchased several of these Drobo disk arrays, which are capable of hosting all of our current work files. This will allow us to catalog our material much faster than we have been ever been able to in the past.

Currently, our two main computers are 6 years old and our 12 years old backup computers died recently. We make do with what we have, but in order to run the database properly, we need speed. If you are upgrading your Mac, consider donating your old one to Animation Resources. We are a 501(c)(3) non-profit, so your donation may be tax deductible. Our short term goal is to get a Mac Pro with solid state drives that will be able to run our whole database at usable speeds. But we can’t afford that with the number of members we now have.

Eventually, we would like to start migrating our database to a cloud server, accessible through the Members Only Page. We would also like to be able to make our collection available to universities and libraries via the internet, so the archive’s reach can be worldwide. That’s still a few years in the future, but every step we take gets us closer and closer to our goal. The speed that we progress is directly related to the amount of financial support our members contribute to the project.

JOIN ANIMATION RESOURCES

JOIN ANIMATION RESOURCES AND SUPPORT OUR WORK

There is no better time than now to JOIN Animation Resources. Download a sample Reference Pack and check out all the reasons you should JOIN NOW! https://animationresources.org/memberappreciation/

If you are a creative artist, you should be a member of Animation Resources so you can be a part of everything we do… The best part is that your dues rate is grandfathered in for as long as you maintain your membership with us. When we do put our database online, dues will be significantly higher to support the required bandwidth. But the members who helped us get to that point will share in our achievements with a low dues rate forever. It’s our way of thanking the people who help us grow.

CLICK HERE To Join Animation Resources Today

PayPalAnimationAnimation Resources depends on your contributions to support its projects. Even if you can’t afford to join our group right now, please click the button below to donate whatever you can afford using PayPal.


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Monday, February 24th, 2020

Grim Natwick’s Century of Learning

Animation Resources

One thing I’ve noticed among certain young animators is a tendency to focus exclusively on things that directly apply to whatever project they’re currently working on. Referencing art in a different style or from a different period in time can sometimes be seen by them as a distraction, or worse yet, irrelevant to their work as an artist. This is a very bad habit to get into, because it builds a box around an artists’ creativity. After a few years, this focus settles into a form of tunnel-vision. At Animation Resources, our primary purpose is to help artists “think outside the box”.

There have been a few people I’ve met in my life who saw the big picture clearly. Grim Natwick was one of them. He had an incredibly broad view of animation, which isn’t surprising because his career in animation spanned nearly seven decades! Grim was a storyteller, and even though his long convoluted stories jumped across decades and diverse subjects like the cow jumping over the moon, his thought process was like a laser beam focused on the essence of what it means to be an artist.

When you look at Grim’s career, it’s astonishing. He started out working on silent Happy Hooligan cartoons, He went on to create Betty Boop and animate Flip the Frog, Snow White, Woody Woodpecker, Mr Magoo, and Crusader Rabbit, and ended his career animating on Richard Williams’ “Thief and the Cobbler”. I once asked Grim to what he attributed his long and varied career. He didn’t hesitate. He answered right away…

“My education.”

Grim Natwick

Grim studied illustration and design in Chicago, but soon he found himself working in animation, and he realized his skills and education weren’t up to the task. He took a year off and travelled to Vienna to get formal art training. Every day of his life, Grim set aside an hour to do self study. He would pull a book on Picasso off the shelf and sit down at his drawing board and try to figure out Picasso’s shapes and abstraction. He would sketch from Reubens to learn composition. He’d break down the work of illustrators like Rackham and try to capture their watercolor techniques. All of this informed his animation and made it possible for him to reinvent himself when it was called for.

I have only worked in the field for thirty years myself, but I have seen most of the people I started out working with fall away from animation. They weren’t able to keep up with technology, or they refused to work in any other style than the one they had been trained in. Animation evolved and changed, and they were left behind because they refused to think outside their own box.

Here is a video of Grim speaking with Reg Hartt in Toronto in the early 80s. In this interview he discusses a wide range of subjects, from fine art to illustration- at one point he digresses all the way to Indonesian shadow puppets- but every bit of it directly applies to his life as an animator. And it directly applies to your life as an animator too.


GRIM NATWICK INTERVIEW 1982
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4CEYYLr9tRU

When I was in college, I looked Grim up in the phone book and visited him at his apartment in Santa Monica. I aspired to work in animation and I wanted to learn how animators think. I couldn’t have had a better person to learn from. I would sit on Grim’s front porch and ask him questions. Then the stories would unfold in front of me, giving me an overview of what the artform was all about, and most importantly, insight into what it could be.

Grim NatwickIt’s 30 years later now, but I still think about the things Grim talked about. Grim never put himself in a stylistic box. He worked in every style and never stopped learning.

Young animators sometimes look at what we are doing at Animation Resources and think to themselves, “That’s old stuff. It doesn’t apply to me.” Professional animators sometimes look at it and say to themselves, “I’m a professional now. I’m not in school any more. I don’t need to study.” Grim Natwick never thought that way. He saw the interrelationships between different styles and forms of art. He credited his studies for keeping him relevant in the business long after his contemporaries had moved on or retired. Grim lived and breathed his art. He had a passion for it and he could put that passion into words. He could teach it to others. All of that is important and all of it applies to the life and career of every artist.

When I discovered this video interview, I realized how much of what Grim planted in me has developed into what Animation Resources has become today. Grim’s approach to his art is a shining example for all of us to follow. Whether you’re a student or a pro, exploring and learning and discovering new things should be a part of your daily life. Animation Resources wants to help you do that.

Open The Treasures That Open Your Mind

Treasures

The secrets of a long and fulfilling career in animation are right in front of your face. But you’ll never recognize those treasures if you don’t make an effort to think beyond what you already know and like. Every other month, members of Animation Resources can download a Reference Pack full of inspiration and ideas to help you think outside your own box. During Member Appreciation Month, Animation Resources is pulling out all the stops to share some of our greatest treasures with our members. Throughout the year, we’ll be offering up incredible, thought provoking material that can change the way you think and help you grow as an artist. If you are a creative person, you should be a member of Animation Resources.

For a rundown of all the perks of Animation Resources membership, seeā€¦ https://animationresources.org/memberappreciation/

JOIN Animation Resources today!
https://animationresources.org/membership/levels/

The world of animaton owes a tremendous debt of gratitude to Reg Hartt for sharing this incredible video with us.



FREE Sample Reference Pack!

Check out this SAMPLE REFERENCE PACK! It will give you a taste of what Animation Resources members get to download every other month!

Sample RefPack

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More members mean we can bring you more special downloads.

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Problems or questions? Email…
membership@animationresources.org

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Friday, February 21st, 2020

What’s In Animation Resources’ Reference Packs?

JOIN ANIMATION RESOURCES

Animation Resources is a 501(c)(3) non-profit educational organization dedicated to serving the self study needs of animators, cartoonists and illustrators. If you are a creative person with an interest in the field, we hope you will choose to become a member of Animation Resources. Every other month, members are given access to a high resolution e-book and several DVD quality animated films, curated by the Board of Animation Resources.

JOIN ANIMATION RESOURCES

This sample Reference Pack is designed to give you an idea of what Animation Resources has to offer its members. By the end of the year, our members will have been able to access downloads of SIX E-BOOKS totaling over a thousand pages of incredible high resolution scans, and over FIVE HOURS of rare cartoons. Membership rates are just $85 annually for General Membership, and $60 a year for full time students and educators. It’s the greatest bargain in animation. You’ll be inspired and learn too!

Reference Pack

REFPACK 001: Sample RefPack

DOWNLOADING INSTRUCTIONS: Below are the links to the sample Reference Pack. To download the files, RIGHT CLICK on the link (Mac users OPTION CLICK) and select SAVE TO DISK. We are delivering high resolution files to you. When you click, it might take several minutes to finish the download, so please be patient. If the link doesn’t work, refresh this page and try again. It’s best to download the files one at a time, rather than all at once. This will avoid timeouts.

PLEASE NOTE: This material may be protected by copyright and is provided to supporters of Animation Resources under Fair Use provisions for critical analysis, educational and reference purposes only. Permission to copy and print is granted for personal use only and these files are not to be distributed or shared with others. All rights reserved. After the period of availability, these files will be deleted from the server and may never be offered again. Downloading of this material constitutes agreement to these terms.

PDF E-BOOKS:
Best of 25

Best of E-Books 1 to 25 Volume 1 & 2
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A Sampler of the First 4 Years of RefPack E-Books

The creative world of animation has its roots in the art of cartooning, and the history of cartooning extends back centuries. Over the past four years, Animation Resources’ e-books have included thousands of pages of classic cartooning, illustration and art instruction, ranging from 16th century woodblocks to newspaper comics from the 1920s, to powerful political cartoons from around the world, to complete courses teaching the fundamentals of cartooning and caricature… all designed to broaden the horizons of both professional and student artists.

This pair of e-books gather together some of the highlights from the first 25 members only e-books. It is provided to the general public to give prospective members an idea of what they will receive when they join. Members and volunteers are the lifeblood of our organization and we appreciate everything that the hundreds of people who have contrinuted to our efforts have accomplished. These e-books are dedicated to them.

Best of 25 E-Book Volume 1
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Adobe PDF File / 192 Pages / 800 MB Download

Best of 25 E-Book Volume 2
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Adobe PDF File / 188 Pages / 779 MB Download


JOIN TODAY!
https://animationresources.org/membership/levels/

DVD QUALITY VIDEO:
Best of 25

Best of Videos 1 to 25 Volume 1 & 2
Sampler Reels of the First 4 Years of RefPack Animation Videos

Some people are under the mistaken impression that animation is a genre, best suited for children’s cartoons. They think that specific established styles and techniques are the only way cartoons should look. It’s easy even for animators to fall into the trap of making cartoons that look just like all the other cartoons on TV and in theaters. But Animation Resources encourages film makers to think of animation as a medium, capable of doing innovative and great things. We encourage our members to think outside the box by sharing unique examples of powerful animated film making that exploit the best aspects of the medium.

In the past four years of Reference Packs, Animation Resources members have had an opportunity to see rarely seen films of all types, from century old silent shorts, to stop motion puppet films, animation from China, Japan and Russia; animated commercials from the early 1950s; classic theatrical cartoons; experimental animation and rare industrial training films… Our intent is not to bring back a “golden age” of animation. We encourage artists to build on the past as a foundation for surpassing it.

This pair of reels gather together some clips of the highlights from the first 25 members only Reference Packs. They are provided to the general public to give prospective members an idea of what they will receive when they join.

Best of 25 Video Reel 1
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M4V Video File / 18:49 / 434 MB Download

Best of 25 Video Reel 1
Download Page
M4V Video File / 18:49 / 448 MB Download


JOIN TODAY!
https://animationresources.org/membership/levels/

Bonus Download

With every Reference Pack, we’ll be including a bonus video or e-book from one of our past Reference Packs. This time we are sharing a book and two rare wartime training films!

PDF E-BOOK:
Plastic Man

Jack Cole’s
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Plastic Man
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Issues Nos. 1, 2 & 3 (1943)

Jack Cole’s “Plastic Man” debuted in Police Comics in 1941 and was an immediate hit. Cole’s offbeat humor and Plastic Man’s ability to take any shape gave the cartoonist the opportunities to experiment with text and graphics in groundbreaking manner, helping to define the medium’s vocabulary, and making the idiosyncratic character one of the few enduring classics from the Golden Age to modern times. Plastic Man gained his own title in 1943.

This PDF e-book contains the first three issues of Plastic Man comics and includes a biography of Jack Cole. It is optimized for display on the iPad or printing two up with a cover on 8 1/2 by 11 inch paper.

REFPACK001: Plastic Man
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Adobe PDF File / 183 Pages / 245.5 MB Download


JOIN TODAY!
https://animationresources.org/membership/levels/

DVD QUALITY VIDEO:
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Private Snafu Gas

REFPACK001: Private Snafu in Gas
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Army/Navy Screen Magazine (1944)

The Private Snafu training cartoons were produced by Warner Bros for the War Department during WWII. “Gas”, which deals with the importance of having an operating gas mask handy, was directed by Chuck Jones and written by Ted “Dr Seuss” Geisel. The voices were by Mel Blanc and Billy Bletcher.

REFPACK001: Private Snafu in Gas
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M4V Video File / 4:43 / 77.5 MB Download

This DVD quality MP4 file is provided courtesy of Thunderbean Animation and is included in HD on Private Snafu Golden Classics.


JOIN TODAY!
https://animationresources.org/membership/levels/

DVD QUALITY VIDEO:
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Van Beuren Circus Capers

Aesop’s Fables: Circus Capers
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Van Beuren Studios (1930)

Disney admitted that in the 1920s, his goal was to produce cartoons as good as the Aesops Fables series. However after the Fables introduced a boy and girl mouse that bore a strong resemblance to Mickey and Minnie, Disney filed suit and had the cartoons pulled from theaters. This cartoon is one of the most blatant Mickey ripoffs, and one of the funniest.

REFPACK001: Circus Capers
Download Page
M4V Video File / 9:13 / 230.5 MB Download

This DVD quality MP4 file is provided courtesy of Thunderbean Animation and is included on Uncensored Animation from Van Beuren.


Tell A FriendTell A FriendTell A Friend
Tell your friends to join Animation Resources!
Download Page
More members mean we can bring you more special downloads.

CLICK TO JOIN TODAY!

Problems or questions? Email…
membership@animationresources.org

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