May 31st, 2023

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LAST CALL! A Peek At The International Downloads

People who aren’t members of Animation Resources don’t understand how comprehensive our Reference Packs are. Over the next couple of weeks, we will be posting what each section of our current RefPack looks like. If you are a member of Animation Resources, click on this post to go to the Members Only page. If you aren’t a member yet, today is the perfect time to join! Our current Reference Pack is one of our best yet, and General and Student Members get access to a special Bonus Archive with even more material from past Reference Packs.

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International Animation

The world of animation is much bigger than it might appear to us at first glance. We are all familiar with the films we grew up with, but Hollywood wasn’t the only place that produced great cartoons… Poland, Japan, Russia, China and Europe all have their own traditions and a rich history of animated film making. Animation Resources’ archive contains many foreign films that are rarely seen in the United States. We feature a sampling of interesting animation from around the world in each Reference Pack.

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Khitruk Stompy

Stompy
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Fyodor Khitruk / Soyuzmultfilm, Russia / 1964
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In previous Reference Packs, we shared Fyodor Khitruk’s adaptation of A. A. Milne’s stories about Winnie the Pooh. This time, we are sharing one of Khitruk’s early films, “Stompy”.

Khitruk Stompy

Fyodor Khitruk was a Russian Jew who studied graphic design in Moscow at the OGIS College For Applied Arts. He joined the staff of Soyuzmultfilm in 1938, learning his craft by animating in over 200 films until he was given the opportunity to direct his first film, “The Story Of A Crime” in 1962. This film was a huge success and inspired the artists at Soyuzmultfilm to abandon the hyper-realistic style the studio was known for and explore graphic stylization, not unlike the effect UPA had on Hollywood animation. His films tend to be leisurely paced, but not slow, and the motion of his characters is always carefully observed and relatable.

Khitruk Stompy

Khitruk made both adult satire and children’s films, like “Stompy”. This film has some narration, but it isn’t necessary to understand it to follow the action of the film. Khitruk’s design in this film is brilliant, especially the use of flat areas of color surrounding lush textures. It makes you want to reach out and pet the characters.

REFPACK051: Stompy 1964
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Karel Dodal

Mystery Of The MK204 Turning Point
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Karel Dodal / Prague, Czechoslovakia / 1934

In one of our previous Reference Packs, we included two commercials from Czechoslovakia. This time, we feature a very early animated commercial by Karel Dodal.

Karel Dodal

The history of animation in Czechoslovakia goes back to the 1920s. Karel Dodal, not only produced advertisements like this one (some featuring Felix the Cat), but also puppet and experimental films. The notes that came with this film were sparse and all in the Czech language, so we don’t know much about them. If you have information about Dodal you can share with us, please drop us a line.

Karel Dodal

We hope to have more Czech animation to share with you in future Reference Packs.

REFPACK051: Mystery 1934
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The Breakdown

The Breakdown
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Klaus Georgi & Lutz Stutzner / DEFA, East Germany / 1988

The DEFA studio (Deutsche Film-Aktiengesellschaft) was independently established in the Soviet Occupied Zone in 1946 to produce propaganda films with the intent of re-educating the East German populace, who had just emerged from under the Nazi rule. A year later, control of the studio was taken over by the Socialist Unity Party, a Stalinist political group, and many of the original founders were ejected from the governing board. The studio got absorbed by the government when the German Democratic Republic was established in 1949. The ideological oppression discouraged most talented filmmakers from working at the studio, and by the time Stalin died in 1953, only 50 films had been produced. Within a couple of years of the end of Stalinism, DEFA began to grow exponentially, and between 1955 and 1992 when the studio closed, DEFA produced over 800 animated films.

The Breakdown

Lutz Stutzner was trained as a designer of posters. While attending school in Dresden, he met Otto Muller the head of the DEFA animation studios, who encouraged him to apply as a trainee at the studio. He rose to the position of director and teamed with Klaus Georgi who had helped to establish the animation division at DEFA. Georgi directed over 80 animated films in a variety of techniques: cel animation, cut outs, silhouette and puppet animation. When the Berlin Wall fell, many of the state owned businesses were liquidated, including DEFA. Lutz Stutzner was instrumental in organizing efforts to rescue important artifacts and film elements from East German film studios from being dispersed.

The Breakdown

Originally, the film ended with a procession of tanks following the motorcade, but state censors forced them to alter the gag to just infer military vehicles, rather than fully depicting them. Even so, the animation division enjoyed much more of a “hands off” treatment from the government censors than the live action filmmakers at DEFA. This kind of political satire would never have been allowed in one of their live action productions.

REFPACK051: The Breakdown 1988
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Professor Balthazar

Professor Balthazar in “The Rise And Fall Of Horatio”
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Zlatko Grgic / Zagreb Films, Croatia / 1967

In a previous Reference Pack we featured several Maxi-Cat mini-cartoons by Zlatko Grgic, a Croatian animator who later emigrated to Canada to join the Canadian Film Board.

Professor Balthazar

Grgic is best known for his series of cartoons featuring the character Professor Balthazar, an old man who solves problems for his friends by creating inventions with a magical machine. Produced between 1967 and 1973, the series ran all over the world. Its silent pantomime with voice over narration made it easy to translate to other countries. It aired everywhere from New Zealand to Romania to Zimbabwe. In the United States it was featured on Chuck Jones’ television program, Curiosity Shop.

Professor Balthazar

Altogether there were 59 episodes of Professor Balthazar produced between 1969 and 1978. We will be sharing more with you in upcoming Reference Packs.

REFPACK051: Professor Balthazar Ep. 02
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Animation Resources is one of the best kept secrets in the world of cartooning. Every month, we sponsor a program of interest to artists, and every other month, we share a book and up to an hour of rare animation with our members. If you are a creative person interested in the fields of animation, cartooning or illustration, you should be a member of Animation Resources!

It’s easy to join Animation Resources. Just click on this link and you can sign up right now online…


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Posted by Stephen Worth @ 12:46 pm

May 30th, 2023

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LAST CALL! RefPack051: A Peek At The Featured Downloads

People who aren’t members of Animation Resources don’t understand how comprehensive our Reference Packs are. Over the next couple of weeks, we will be posting what each section of our current RefPack looks like, starting today with the Featured section. If you are a member of Animation Resources, click on this post to go to the Members Only page. If you aren’t a member yet, today is the perfect time to join! Our current Reference Pack is one of our best yet, and General and Student Members get access to a special Bonus Archive with even more material from past Reference Packs.

What are you waiting for?
Download Page
JOIN TODAY!
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Reference Pack

Every other month, Animation Resources shares a new Reference Pack with its members. They consist of an e-book packed with high resolution scans and video downloads set up for still frame study. Make sure you download the Reference Pack before it’s updated. When it’s gone, it’s gone!


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REFPACK051: April / May 2023

PDF E-BOOK
Hiroshige Tokaido Road

53 Stations Of The Tokaido Road
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Utagawa Hiroshige
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Utagawa HiroshigeTell A FriendIn 1603 the then ruler of Japan, Tokugawa Iyeyasu established Edo (which today is known as Tokyo) as the seat of the Shogunate, and built a series of roads radiating outward to the rest of Japan. As we explained in a previous Reference Pack, every year all of the Daimyo, or regional princes, were required to relocate from their territories to Edo, carrying all of their families, courtiers and warriors with them. When these processions traversed the road, they might number as many as 20,000 people.

The greatest of these roads was the Tokaido, which reached 320 miles from Edo to Kyoto, and was divided into fifty-three stations. These stations were spaced about a half day’s travels apart. It could take as little as two weeks to go from one end of the road to the other. But bad weather could extend it to a month, requiring travelers to spend several days at a single station until the river went down or the rain stopped. At these 53 stations were horse stables, porters for hire, lodging houses, restaurants, religious shrines and brothels which were maintained by the local governors to serve the Daimyo as they passed through. For the rest of the year, these post houses served citizen travelers who had business in other parts of the country.

Hiroshige Tokaido Road

The Tokaido Road teemed with travelers of all kinds. In contrast with the pothole studded muddy roads in Europe at the time, it was well maintained with a smooth gravel surface that made travel easy. The local officials would oversee the operation of the stations and ensure the travelers’ safety. Each night the gates of the town were closed and no one could leave or enter. Crime was relatively rare because it was brutally punished. The bodies of thieves and murderers were displayed alongside the road on the approach to each town to discourage criminals from stopping there. Along the road were arches which marked out the distances. By counting these markers, a courier could calculate charges for delivering packages and correspondence.

All classes of people travelled the roads, from the Emperor to regional governors to shogun warriors to messengers to common people. Each type of traveler would have a different mode of conveyance. High ranking officials would travel in enclosed tents carried on poles called norimoto. You could tell the rank of the traveller by the number of carriers. The norimoto of a nobleman would be very long, borne by a dozen men, while a merchant might just have two porters assisting him. Differences in class were most visible at river crossings. Those of high rank would be carried on covered palanquins, keeping them high and dry; while commoners had to ford the river on foot, carrying their belongings on their heads. At a couple of  points in the trip, there were boatmen to carry groups of people across larger bodies of water. By law, only samurai warriors were allowed to ride horses, so common people could only use them as pack animals. But rules were bent and commoners were allowed to ride if the horse was led by the bridle by a porter on foot.

Hiroshige Tokaido Road

The system of roads in Japan was the subject of a lot of travel literature in the Edo period. Many illustrated guides offered views of the various stations and advice for travelers. But these illustrations were mostly in books, not the subject of decorative prints. Around 1830, both Hokusai and Hiroshige began producing series of woodblock prints, known in Japan as ukiyo-e, depicting landscapes, rather than images of kabuki actors, courtesans and mythology, which had been the principle popular subjects up to that point. Hokusai’s first series was titled Thirty-Six Views of Mt Fuji, and it included one of the most iconic images in Japanese art, “The Great Wave Off Kanagawa”. But even more famous is Hiroshige’s series titled Fifty-Three Stations Of The Tokaido. We are sharing a complete set of this masterpiece of Asian art with you in this Reference Pack.

The traditional story says that in 1832, Hiroshige accompanied an official delegation traveling the Tokaido to deliver horses as a gift from the shogun to the Imperial court. Along the way he made sketches, and when he got home to Edo, he immediately began work on a series of prints depicting each of the stages of the journey, along with two additional prints for the beginning and end of the road. However, historians doubt that he actually visited all of the stations he depicted. The fifteenth print in the series depicts a village named Kanbara in the snow. But that part of Japan rarely has snowfall, while a town with a similar name in the mountains does. It is thought that he might have cribbed the elements of his design from a travel guide, not realizing it was a different place. Other clues indicate that the places depicted might have been more in Hiroshige’s imagination than in any specific part of the Tokaido Road.

Hiroshige Tokaido Road

It is important to remember that the purpose of ukiyo-e was not to literally represent what a place looked like, but rather to convey the feeling and memory of actually being there. Colors represented specific moods and times of day. The tipped perspective indicated distances all at once on the page, with near objects at the bottom of the print, and distant ones at the top. Human figures represented the range of personalities one might find at that place. Geographic features and foliage were exaggerated to indicate their relationship to the landscape. The way I think about it is like maps of cities that have places of interest illustrated with cartoons of people doing things at amusement parks, museums or theaters. The map has two layers to it… one layer cartographical and the other layer a comment on what people do at that location. Japanese landscapes have an illustrative layer and a poetic one.

Andrew Kozlowski said it well when he wrote in an article on the Tokaido prints, “When I look at these prints what I see is a young man who for the first time is experiencing a world outside of everything he has ever known, whether done through experience or imagination, but most likely some combination of both. He wants it to be filled with beauty, and he moves mountains and rivers to accomplish this, he turns the sun and moon on and off at will, he brings the wind and snow and rain like movie props. Hiroshige drops us into the scene not at the point at which we actually experience it, but the one from which it is best experienced.”

Hiroshige Tokaido Road

The Tokaido Road in Kanagawa in the late 1800s

The series was initially published simultaneously by two different publishers, Hoeido and Senkakudo. Each print sold for between 12 and 16 copper coins, which was roughly the cost of a bowl of soup at the time. It was a huge success. The first group of blocks wore out and were followed by another edition, and another. The Fifty-Three Stations continues to be published using the original woodblock printing method to the current day. Vincent Van Gogh and Frank Lloyd Wright were both collectors of Hiroshige’s prints from this series. Unquestionably, Hiroshige is the most successful and popular designer of ukiyo-e of all time, and The Fifty-Three Stations Of The Tokaido is his masterpiece.

Animation Resources was able to obtain a replica of the original Hoeido edition of this important work produced around 1972 using the same woodblock carving and hand printing technique as in Hiroshige’s time. It’s important to note that Western art’s concept of authenticity doesn’t apply to ukiyo-e. The artist responsible for the design provided a line drawing, but had little to do with the way the carver handled textures and details; and the carver would have very little interaction with the printmaker who would mix the colors by eye for each set of prints. The woodblocks themselves wore out after a couple thousand impressions, so they were recarved and recolored, often by different craftsmen each time. As blocks wore out, they generally wouldn’t be replaced all at once. They would be recarved and substituted when needed, so one edition might have color blocks from a more than one carver or edition. Hand printing is inconsistent. Some impressions are lighter or darker than others. The variation between different copies of the same print can be huge.

Hiroshige Tokaido Road

Sorting all this out to determine what the “original” prints looked like is impossible. The relationship between a designer, carver and printmaker is a lot like the relationship between a composer, conductor and orchestra. Each one adds something of themselves to the work. Just like a Beethoven symphony is invariably by Beethoven, each performance of it brings different aspects of the music to the fore. A conductor may vary tempi to create a specific emotion, and the string section may have a unique texture, exclusive to that orchestra. Likewise, a carver might have his own technique of handling skies and a printer might favor more gradual transitions between colors. If you compare two prints of the same image, you might find dozens of small differences between them.

Mistakes can creep in as well. One famous mistake is in the 10th Station of the Tokaido Road series. A section of the mountainside was left off all the color blocks of an early edition, so it was pure white. The print with this error was used as the model for decades and decades. Carvers and printers dutifully repeated the same error in tens of thousands of prints. The carver of the edition Animation Resources is sharing is one of the few who corrected that particular error. On the 53rd Station, some printmakers color it as a night scene and others as daylight. There is no “authentic version” of any ukiyo-e print. Each edition must be judged on its own merits.

Hiroshige Tokaido Road

These are not cartoons, designed to be flipped through quickly. The images look deceptively simple at first, but closer examination will reveal amazing details that make the pictures come to life. There is an unearthly perfection to the compositions. They all lead your eye around the image in interesting ways. When you look at these images, take your time to fully absorb them. You’ll be richly rewarded. Each one is a world unto itself.

Another thing to consider as you wander down the road with Hiroshige is that Japanese people read images right to left, not left to right. That might seem to not matter, but it actually does matter a great deal with many of these compositions. Look, for instance at the tenth station. A Westerner sees Mt. Fuji first and works his way over to the travelers on the road. But a Japanese person would start with the people and move along further and further into the distance in layers as his eye goes from right to left, settling finally on the iconic view of Mt. Fuji. This reading reflects the relationship of the people to the vast panorama much better than reading it the other way around.

Hiroshige Tokaido Road

Woodblock prints are printed on special handmade paper, and the surface of the medium is as much a part of the texture of the image as the colors printed on it. Some people insist that prints should be photographed with the light source coming strongly from one direction to highlight the tooth of the paper. It’s difficult with a digital scan to reproduce that look and feel, but the team at Animation Resources has made an effort to calibrate color settings, digitize at a high resolution, and avoid any digital artifacts from creeping in. We hope it gives you an idea of why ukiyo-e is so special.

Frank Lloyd Wright called Hiroshige’s Tokaido prints “the most valuable contributions ever made to the art of the world.” We’re proud to be able to share them with you, so you can add them to your own digital library.

REFPACK051: 53 Stations Of The Tokaido Road
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John Sutherland

It’s Everybody’s Business
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Carl Urbano / John Sutherland Productions / 1954

John Sutherland was born in North Dakota, the son of a bank president. Droughts caused local ranchers to default on their loans and the banks managed by Sutherland’s father went bankrupt. His family relocated to California, where John enrolled in UCLA, studying political science and economics. Contacts at UCLA put him in contact with Walt Disney, who hired him to work as an assistant director, which was basically a production job. Later, Sutherland was moved to the story department, where he worked with the artists there to write dialogue and prepare recording scripts. He is said to have provided the voice for adult Bambi, but he got no credit for his voice work.

Sutherland left Disney on good terms shortly before the strike, and Disney recommended him to Darryl Zanuck, the head of 20th Century Fox. Zanuck sent him to Washington D.C. to serve as a director and producer of military training films. For a while, he worked on both coasts, producing films for the Army and Navy, while developing feature projects in Hollywood. But when the United States entered the war, the Department of Defense guaranteed him enough work for him to produce films full time for the government.

John Sutherland

In 1945, Sutherland opened his own studio, producing animated short films for United Artists as well as industrial and propaganda films. Between 1945 and the mid-1960s, his studio averaged about twenty films a year, many of them financed by a grant from Alfred P. Sloan, the head of General Motors. These films promoted the values of capitalism and the American way of life. Other films were financed by large corporations, like General Electric and U.S. Steel.

Sutherland’s films had high production values thanks to the top artists that worked under him. Carl Urbano directed the film we are sharing here, and Bill Scott and George Gordon were the story artists. The animators on this short include Emery Hawkins, Abe Levitow and Bill Melendez, and the production designer was Maurice Noble. The music is by Les Baxter and Eugene Poddany. That’s a staff that would be the envy of any major animation studio.

John Sutherland

In the past, Animation Resources has shared quite a few industrial films by Sutherland as well as Jam Handy, Paul Fennell and UPA. These films were intended to be shown to a specific audience at a particular place and time. They weren’t intended to be saved and re-distributed like entertainment films. Because of this, information on them is scarce, and many haven’t survived. We’re happy to be able to share this wonderful example with you in this Reference Pack.

REFPACK051: It’s Everybody’s Business 1954
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Many thanks to Steve Stanchfield from Thunderbean Animation for sharing this rare film with us.


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Sample RefPack

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Animation Resources is a 501(c)(3) non-profit arts organization dedicated to providing self study material to the worldwide animation community. Every month, we sponsor a program of interest to artists, and every other month, we share a book and up to an hour of rare animation with our members. If you are a creative person interested in the fields of animation, cartooning or illustration, you should be a member of Animation Resources!

It’s easy to join Animation Resources. Just click on this link and you can sign up right now online…


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PayPalAnimationAnimation Resources depends on your contributions to support its projects. Even if you can’t afford to join our group right now, please click the button below to donate whatever you can afford using PayPal.


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Posted by Stephen Worth @ 10:30 am

May 29th, 2023

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RefPack051: Last Call. Download Now!

Reference Pack

Every other month, Animation Resources shares a new Reference Pack with its members. They consist of e-books packed with high resolution scans video downloads of rare animated films set up for still frame study, as well as podcasts and documentaries— all designed to help you become a better artist. Make sure you download this Reference Pack before it’s updated. When it’s gone, it’s gone!


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The latest Animation Resources Reference Pack has been uploaded to the server. Here’s a quick overview of what you’ll find when you log in to the members only page…

PDF E-BOOK
Hiroshige Tokaido Road

53 Stations Of The Tokaido Road
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Utagawa Hiroshige
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Animation Resources is proud to be able to share an e-book featuring the complete collection of one of the masterpieces of Japanese art, Utagawa Hiroshige’s 53 Stations Of The Tokaido Road. Vincent Van Gogh collected prints from this set, and Frank Lloyd Wright described them as "the most valuable contributions ever made to the art of the world." These are not cartoons, designed to be flipped through quickly. The images look deceptively simple at first, but closer examination will reveal amazing details that make the pictures come to life. Each one is a world unto itself.

SD VIDEO:
John Sutherland

It’s Everybody’s Business
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Carl Urbano / John Sutherland Productions / 1954

John Sutherland was a producer of industrial films. His studio maintained high production values thanks to the top artists that worked under him. Carl Urbano directed the film we are sharing here, and Bill Scott and George Gordon were the story artists. The animators on this short include Emery Hawkins, Abe Levitow and Bill Melendez, and the production designer was Maurice Noble. The music is by Les Baxter and Eugene Poddany. That’s a staff that would be the envy of any major animation studio.


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Khitruk Stompy

Stompy
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Fyodor Khitruk / Soyuzmultfilm, Russia / 1964
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In previous Reference Packs, we shared Fyodor Khitruk’s adaptation of A. A. Milne’s stories about Winnie the Pooh. This time, we are sharing one of Khitruk’s early films, "Stompy". Khitruk’s design in this film is brilliant, especially the use of flat areas of color surrounding lush textures. It makes you want to reach out and pet the characters.

SD VIDEO:
Karel Dodal

Mystery Of The MK204 Turning Point
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Karel Dodal / Prague, Czechoslovakia / 1934

In one of our previous Reference Packs, we included two commercials from Czechoslovakia. This time, we feature a very early animated commercial by Karel Dodal. The history of animation in Czechoslovakia goes back to the 1920s. Karel Dodal, not only produced advertisements like this one (some featuring Felix the Cat), but also puppet and experimental films.

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The Breakdown

The Breakdown
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Klaus Georgi & Lutz Stutzner / DEFA, East Germany / 1988

Lutz Stutzner was trained as a designer of posters. While attending school in Dresden, he met Otto Muller the head of the DEFA animation studios in East Germany, who encouraged him to apply as a trainee at the studio. He rose to the position of director and teamed with Klaus Georgi who had helped to establish the animation division at DEFA. Georgi directed over 80 animated films in a variety of techniques: cel animation, cut outs, silhouette and puppet animation. When the Berlin Wall fell, many of the state owned businesses were liquidated, including DEFA. Lutz Stutzner was instrumental in organizing efforts to rescue important artifacts and film elements from East German film studios from being dispersed.


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Professor Balthazar

Professor Balthazar in "The Rise And Fall Of Horatio"
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Zlatko Grgic / Zagreb Films, Croatia / 1967

In a previous Reference Pack we featured several Maxi-Cat mini-cartoons by Zlatko Grgic, a Croatian animator who later emigrated to Canada to join the Canadian Film Board. Grgic is best known for his series of cartoons featuring the character Professor Balthazar, an old man who solves problems for his friends by creating inventions with a magical machine. Produced between 1967 and 1973, the series ran all over the world. Its silent pantomime with voice over narration made it easy to translate to other countries It aired everywhere from New Zealand to Romania to Zimbabwe. In the United States it was featured on Chuck Jones’ television program, Curiosity Shop.

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Big X

Big X
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Curated by JoJo Baptista
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Eps. 41 & 50 / TMS, Osamu Tezuka (1964)
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Big X was created by Osamu Tezuka, and it was the first television series produced by TMS (Tokyo Movie Shinsha). It debuted on August 3rd, 1964 and 59 episodes were made, of which 22 survive. This early series breaks a lot of rules, from wildly off model poses to crazy perspective in the backgrounds to strange exaggerated movement. The artists were experimenting and learning as they went. The results are pretty rough, but they manage to make a fun and entertaining show, even with all the mistakes.


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Hans Richter

Four Films By Hans Richter
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Rhythmus 21 (1921) / Ghosts For Breakfast (1927)
Hans Richter
Inflation (1928) / Race Symphony (1928)

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Our Sidetracks section features a pioneer of abstract filmmaking this time. Although Hans Richter may not be as well known as Salvador Dali, Piet Mondrian or Marcel Duchamp, he occupies as important a role in the history of the Dadaist and abstract movements in art. Between WWI and WWII, he explored abstraction as well as film making. In fact, his experimental film, "Rhytmus 21" was one of the very first abstract animated films. We’re sharing several of his major films, along with an interview done with Richter in 1972. These films may look primitive and technically crude today, but at the time they were made, they were groundbreaking. There was no precedent for these techniques. Throughout his life, Richter was a catalyst, always on the forefront facilitating revolutionary changes in art.

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Trucks and Pans

Trucks & Pans
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Curated By David Eisman
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Animation Resources Board Member, David Eisman discusses a subject you might not have thought about seriously before… trucks and pans. The truck, in essence, is the movement of a camera inward or outward. The pan is the movement of a camera from side-to-side, either left to right or right to left. In live action these camera moves are pretty straightforward, but they are more complicated in hand drawn animated films.


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ANNUAL MEMBER BONUS ARCHIVE
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Available to Student and General Members
  • E-BOOK: Arthur Rackham – Rip Van Winkle & Grimm’s Fairy Tales
  • VIDEO: Three Early Betty Boop Cartoons – Dizzy Dishes / Barnacle Bill / The Bum Bandit
  • VIDEO: Five Films By Norman McLaren – Mail Early / Hen Hop / Fiddle De Dee / Begone Dull Care / Blinkety Blank
Arthur Rackham

ANIMATION RESOURCES ANNUAL MEMBERS: Reference Pack 019 is now being rerun and is now available for download. It includes a PDF e-book of high resolution scans of illustrations by Arthur Rackham, three of the earliest Betty Boop cartoons, and a handful of films by the revolutionary animator Norman McLaren! These downloads will be available until May 1st and after that, they will be deleted from the server. So download them now!

Early Betty Boop

If you are currently on a quarterly membership plan, consider upgrading to an annual membership to get access to our bonus page with even more downloads. If you still have time on you quarterly membership when you upgrade to an annual membership, email us at…

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membership@animationresources.org

…and we will credit your membership with the additional time.

Norman McLaren

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Annual Member Bonus Archive
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Downloads expire after May 1st, 2023


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Whew! That is an amazing collection of treasures! At Animation Resources, our Advisory Board includes great artists and animators like Ralph Bakshi, Will Finn, J.J. Sedelmaier and Sherm Cohen. They’ve let us know the things that they use in their own self study so we can share them with you. That’s experience you just can’t find anywhere else. The most important information isn’t what you already know… It’s the information you should know about, but don’t know yet. We bring that to you every other month.

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Sample RefPack

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Animation Resources is a 501(c)(3) non-profit arts organization dedicated to providing self study material to the worldwide animation community. If you are a creative person working in animation, cartooning or illustration, you owe it to yourself to be a member of Animation Resources.


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Animation Resources is one of the best kept secrets in the world of cartooning. Every month, we sponsor a program of interest to artists, and every other month, we share a book and up to an hour of rare animation with our members. If you are a creative person interested in the fields of animation, cartooning or illustration, you should be a member of Animation Resources!

It’s easy to join Animation Resources. Just click on this link and you can sign up right now online…


JOIN TODAY!
https://animationresources.org/membership/levels/

PayPalAnimationAnimation Resources depends on your contributions to support its projects. Even if you can’t afford to join our group right now, please click the button below to donate whatever you can afford using PayPal.


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Posted by Stephen Worth @ 1:24 pm