Archive for the ‘editorial cartoons’ Category

Tuesday, June 13th, 2017

Editorial Cartoons: Arthur Szyk The New Order

Arthur Szyk was born in Poland and began painting at the age of four. He studied art in Paris until the outbreak of World War I, when he travelled East to study Mohammedan art. In 1914, he joined the Russian army, and later served as an officer in a guerrilla regiment in the Polish army. He married in 1921 and moved back to Paris, where he lived and painted until 1931. Szyk received many important commissions during this time… He illuminated the Covenant of the League of Nations, painted a series of miniatures dealing with the American Revolution that hangs in the White House, and spent three years working on an illumination of the Haggadah, the story of the Jews’ flight from Egypt which was dedicated to the King of England.

In 1940, Szyk relocated to Canada, eventually settling in New York City in 1941. Szyk’s political cartoons, which were published in the newspaper PM, were described by art critic, Thomas Craven as being “as compact as a bomb, extraordinarily lucid in statement, firm and incisive of line, and deadly in their characterizations.” The illustrations we scanned today are from a collection of Szyk’s political cartoons called “The New Order”..

Caricature is the foundation of cartooning. It involves the exaggeration of features to highlight and focus personality traits. Szyk was a master of caricature. His ability to clearly express the arrogance, irony and evil behind the trumped up facade of civilized behavior spoke louder than words. “The New Order” is a rare book. It was ahead of its time when it was published in 1941, before the United States entered the Second World War. Animation Resources was fortunate to locate a clean copy to digitize.

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Resources

Editorial CartoonsEditorial Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Editorial Cartoons.
IllustrationIllustration

This posting is part of a series of articles comprising an online exhibit spotlighting Illustration.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Tuesday, January 24th, 2017

Editorial Cartoons: America On The Brink of War 1916

Cartoons Magazine January 1916

Politics is on everyone’s mind today, so here are some more rare political cartoons. These three articles come from the January, 1916 issue of Cartoons magazine. They paint a vivid picture of the United States on the brink of entering a World War.

SEASON OPENS FOR PEACE DOVES

WWI Cartoons
WWI CartoonsWWI Cartoons
WWI CartoonsWWI Cartoons
WWI CartoonsWWI Cartoons

UNCLE SAM IN EUROPEAN CARICATURE

WWI Cartoons
WWI CartoonsWWI Cartoons
WWI CartoonsWWI Cartoons
WWI CartoonsWWI Cartoons
WWI CartoonsWWI Cartoons

IN THE STORM CENTER OF EUROPE

WWI Cartoons
WWI CartoonsWWI Cartoons
WWI CartoonsWWI Cartoons
WWI CartoonsWWI Cartoons
WWI CartoonsWWI Cartoons
WWI CartoonsWWI
 Cartoons

Stephen Worth
Director
Animation Archive

Editorial CartoonsEditorial Cartoons

This posting is part of the online Encyclopedia of Cartooning under the subject heading, Editorial Cartoons.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Saturday, September 17th, 2011

Encyclopedia: Editorial Cartoonists Jump Page

Editorial Cartoons

The Encyclopedia of Cartooning is the newest part of the Animation Resources website, and it’s still very much under construction. If you are interested in what we plan to do in this space, have a seat and listen to this interview with Stephen Worth where he outlines the history of cartooning and talks about the issues that will be a big part of this section of the Animation Resources site…

A-HAA Podcast hosted by Michael Woodside and Danny Young: Stephen Worth on the History of Cartooning


ARTICLES

WWI ERA

WWII ERA

SPORTS CARTOONISTS

MODERN ERA



BIOGRAPHY


INBETWEENS ARTICLES


Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather